Prostate Cancer

Prostate cancer is one of the most common types of cancer among men, usually growing slowly and remaining in the prostate gland. A man’s risk of developing prostate cancer increases with age, most common in men 65 and older. A family history of prostate cancer and obesity are other risk factors. If detected early, there are many prostate cancer options for successful treatment, including proton therapy for prostate cancer.

94-99%
of low and intermediate risk prostate cancer patients have cancer control
98%
Believe they made the best treatment choice.
98%
Likely to recommend to others

Proton Therapy Treatment for Prostate Cancer

Proton therapy is the most advanced and precise form of radiation therapy, making it one of the most important prostate cancer options. With protons, a high dose of radiation can be delivered directly to the tumor, while sparing much of the adjacent bladder and rectum from unnecessary radiation. Studies have shown that of all the prostate treatment options, treating prostate cancer with proton therapy results in excellent rates of cancer control with very low rates of serious bowel or bladder complications.2

Your physician may also complete a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test, in which a blood sample is collected and analyzed for PSA, a substance naturally produced by the prostate gland. If a higher than normal level of PSA is found, it may indicate various prostate issues, including cancer.

After completing these tests, a doctor may recommend an ultrasound or a prostate biopsy to determine whether or not cancer is present.

Symptoms

Symptoms of prostate cancer tend to appear in the early stages. If you experience one or more of these symptoms for more than two weeks, see your doctor. These symptoms may include:

  • Painful or burning urination
  • Inability to urinate or difficulty in starting to urinate
  • Difficulty trying to hold back urination
  • Weak or interrupted urine flow
  • Frequent or urgent need to urinate
  • Trouble emptying the bladder completely
  • Blood in the urine or semen
  • Continual pain in the lower back, pelvis, hips or thighs
  • Difficulty having an erection

Diagnosis

In order to test for prostate cancers, physicians may complete a digital rectal exam (DRE) in which the prostate is physically examined for irregularities in texture, size, or shape via the rectum, which is adjacent to the prostate. Your physician may also complete a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test, in which a blood sample is collected and analyzed for PSA, a substance naturally produced by the prostate gland. If a higher than normal level of PSA is found, it may indicate various prostate issues, including cancer. After completing these tests, a doctor may recommend an ultrasound or a prostate biopsy to determine whether or not cancer is present.

Treatment

Although prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death in American men, the survival rate is high if detected and treated early in its development. That’s where proton therapy comes in. Proton therapy targets specific treatment areas, allowing higher doses to be administered with fewer side effects and little impact to the surrounding healthy organs and tissues. In fact, with proton therapy, a 5 percent recurrence rate can be reached for prostate cancer, with just a 12 percent chance of complications and acute side effects. Compare that to conventional photon therapy, in which a 20 percent recurrence rate also means a 60 percent chance of complications and acute side effects. Proton therapy is non-invasive and patients will be able to remain in one position during treatment time.

With proton therapy, the rectum and bladder receive much less radiation compared to conventional radiation/X-rays/IMRT. Men treated with proton therapy have a very low risk of long-term side effects, such as incontinence and bowel damage.
With conventional radiation/X-rays/IMRT, more healthy tissue around the tumor receives radiation. The extra dose to healthy tissue from modern X-ray therapy is equivalent to smoking four packs of cigarettes a day for a year. In the chart below, the grey/white areas indicate no radiation exposure, while the colored areas indicate radiation exposure.

Patient Reported Outcomes

Men treated for prostate cancer using proton therapy reported significantly better quality of life than other therapy options.

Living Life the Way I Want After Treatment
71%
Proton Therapy
46%
Brachytherapy
42%
Traditional Radiation
29%
Surgical Procedure

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Provision uses the Space OAR System

SpaceOAR Hydrogel Pushes the Rectum Out of the High Dose Radiation Field. The hydrogel spacer is injected during a minimally invasive procedure, and — once in place — patients typically can’t feel it. The hydrogel is safe and similar to other products used in brain surgery, cardiology and ophthalmology. It remains in place for 3 months during radiation treatment and is then absorbed and leaves the body in the patient’s urine — leaving nothing behind.

Zietman AL, Bae K, Slater JD, et al. Randomized trial comparing conventional-dose with high dose conformal radiation therapy in early-stage adenocarcinoma of the prostate: long-term results from proton radiation oncology group/american college of radiology 95-09. J. Clin. Oncol. 2010; 28(7): 1106-111