Benefits of proton therapy for liver cancer

Liver cancer patients may benefit from advantages of proton therapy

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Proton radiation therapy can improve the overall survival rate for liver cancer patients, according to a new study. The good news for proton advocates comes on the heels of another study identifying predictors to help reduce liver damage from radiation, which could give doctors better insight when determining a patient’s treatment plan.

In a news release from the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), Laura Dawson, MD, President-elect of ASTRO and a professor of radiation oncology at the Princess Margaret Cancer Center in Toronto, remarked on the promise this shows for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma, an often fatal type of liver cancer. “There is hope for patients with liver cancer, with more treatments becoming available in recent years,” said Dawson. “These studies show that protons, like photons, may be used to treat patients with HCC with a high rate of tumor control and a reduced risk of adverse effects.”

About Liver Cancer

One of the largest organs in the body, the liver filters harmful substances from the blood, makes bile to help digest fats and stores sugar for energy.

In 2016, there were approximately 83,000 people living with liver cancer in the United States. While that makes it a relatively less common disease in the U.S., it is still the second leading cause of cancer death around the world. According to the National Cancer Institute, the 5-year survival rate is just 18.4%.1 In comparison, more common cancers like breast (89.9%) and prostate (98%) have much higher survival rates.2,3 

The most common type of liver cancer is Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), a disease in which cancer cells form in the liver tissue. Treatment options for HCC include surgery, ablation therapy, immunotherapy, radiation therapy and others. While the American Cancer Society says surgery may be the best option to cure liver cancer, it’s not always possible. A partial hepatectomy, where the cancerous part of the liver is removed, might not be an option if the patient has other liver disease, like cirrhosis. A liver transplant is also difficult because it can take too long for a donor to become available.

“Surgery remains the gold standard,” noted Nina Sanford, MD and colleagues from Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. “But donor livers are a scarce resource, and a large proportion of patients are either technically or medically inoperable.”

Traditional radiation therapy has had limited success historically, especially for patients with liver damage from hepatitis or cirrhosis. One of the most serious side effects is radiation-induced liver disease (RILD), which can be fatal. Since proton therapy avoids unnecessary radiation to healthy liver tissues, new research suggests it may reduce the risk of RILD.

Study 1: Protons vs. Photons for Liver Cancer

A clinical investigation spearheaded by Sanford and colleagues at Massachusetts General studied proton versus photon radiation therapy for HCC patients who were not candidates for surgery.

“In the United States, patients with HCC tend to have underlying liver disease, which could both preclude them from surgery and make radiation therapy more challenging as well. So, having therapy option that is less toxic could potentially help many patients,” said Dr. Sanford. The study’s authors also noted, “Although dosimetric studies have demonstrated a theoretical advantage using proton therapy,4,5 there have been no clinical studies. We sought to compare outcomes of patients treated for HCC with either modality.”

Researchers followed 133 patients who were treated from 2008 to 2017. The average overall survival for those treated with proton therapy was 31 months, compared to just 14 months for patients treated by traditional radiation. After two years, the overall survival rate for proton patients was 59%, while traditional radiation only had a 28.6% rate.

Not only did the study observe improved survival rates, they also noticed a decrease in non-classic radiation-induced liver disease. Patients receiving proton therapy had a 26% lower risk of RILD, as compared with photon radiation (odds ratio, 0.26; P=.03;).6

Sanford and her colleagues concluded the improved overall survival time could be the result of lower occurrence of RILD, noting that their findings should lead to more research comparing proton and photon radiation for HCC.

“Proton radiation therapy delivers less radiation dose to normal tissues near the tumor, so for patients with HCC, this would mean less unwanted radiation dose impacting the part of the liver that isn’t being targeted,” said Dr. Sanford. “We believe this may lead to lower incidence of liver injury. Because many patients with HCC have underlying liver disease to begin with, it is possible that the lower rates of liver injury in the proton group are what translated to improved survival for those patients.”

Study 2: Identifying Predictors for Liver Damage

A second study sought to identify predictors that could help doctors determine proper proton radiation dosage, while minimizing the risk of RILD in patients with HCC. Led by Dr. Cheng-En Hsieh, MD and colleagues at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital in Taiwan and University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, the study found that the ratio of unirradiated liver volume to standard liver volume is actually the most crucial RILD predictor. In other words, the volume of liver untouched by radiation is more important than the dose of radiation delivered.

“Our data indicate that if a sufficient volume of the liver is spared, ablative radiation can be safely delivered with minimal risk of RILD, regardless of dose,” said Dr. Hsieh.

This study looked at 136 patients with HCC and found a “volume-response” relationship between the liver radiation and RILD. Patients who had a higher volume of their liver exposed to radiation, regardless of dosage, had a higher risk of developing complications.

Identifying this predictor is significant because it allows doctors to better plan a patient’s treatment. Knowing how much of the liver will be exposed to radiation can help determine whether proton therapy is a good option. The study’s authors concluded that if a sufficient volume of the liver can be preserved, proton therapy is an effective treatment of locally advanced liver cancer and the risk of complications is minimal.

Personalizing Your Treatment

“Knowing which metrics predict a greater risk for liver damage can help guide radiation oncologists in determining how to balance the benefits and risks of treatment,” said ASTRO’s Dr. Dawson, stressing that both of these studies highlight the need for a personalized radiation therapy plan when treating liver cancer. “There is rationale for the use of protons for some patients, but the evidence to date is not sufficient for a general recommendation of protons above photon therapy for all HCC patients.”

At Provision CARES, patients will always receive personalized treatment. Our Cancer Care Experts can talk to you about your specific diagnosis and schedule you for a consultation with one of our Board-Certified Radiation Oncologists. Once it’s determined whether proton therapy is right for you, our team of radiation therapists, medical physicists, dosimetrists, oncologists and others will formulate an individual treatment plan designed to destroy the cancer cells, avoid unnecessary radiation to nearby healthy tissue and organs, and minimize the risk of side effects.

Sources

  1. Cancer Stat Facts: Liver and Intraheptic Bile Duct Cancer. National Cancer Institute. Read More
  2. Cancer Stat Facts: Female Breast Cancer. National Cancer Institute. Read More
  3. Cancer State Facts: Prostate Cancer. National Cancer Institute. Read More
  4. Gandhi SJ, Liang X, Ding X, et al. Clinical decision tool for optimal delivery of liver stereotactic body radiation therapy: Photons versus protons. Pract Radiat Oncol 2015;5:209-218.
  5. Wang X, Krishnan S, Zhang X, et al. Proton radiotherapy for liver tumors: Dosimetric advantages over photon plans. Med Dosim 2008; 33:259-267.
  6. Protons versus Photons for Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Liver Decompensation and Overall Surival. International Journal of Radiation Oncology. Read More
  7. Predictors of Radiation-Induced Liver Disease in Eastern and Western Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma Undergoing Proton Beam Therapy. International Journal of Radiation Oncology. Read More

 

Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Breast Cancer Facts: 5 Common Myths Debunked

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One of the toughest parts about researching breast cancer online is trying to sort fact from fiction. The internet is full of half-truths, conflicting reports and flat-out myths about the disease. Provision CARES Proton Therapy is committed to our Culture of CARE, putting the patient experience first. So, for Breast Cancer Awareness Month, we’re debunking five of our most commonly heard myths. All of these breast cancer facts have been verified for quality and accuracy by our cancer care experts to help you make an informed decision about your healthcare.


MYTH: I found a lump in my breast, so I have cancer.

TRUTH: Lumps don’t always indicate cancer. Likewise, the absence of lumps doesn’t always mean you don’t have breast cancer.

While the most common symptom of breast cancer is a lump, most breast lumps are caused by conditions other than cancer. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the two most common causes are fibrocystic breast condition and cysts. Fibrocystic condition causes noncancerous changes in the breast that can make them lumpy, while cysts are small fluid-filled sacs that develop in the breast.

The American Cancer Society (ACS) says lumps are more likely to be cancerous if they are painless, hard and have irregular edges. However, some breast cancers can be painful, soft or round. That’s why you should always check with your doctor if you notice any changes in your breasts.

There are many other symptoms of breast cancer, even if a lump is not detected. These can include swelling of the breast, skin dimpling, breast or nipple pain, nipples turning inward, red or flaking breast skin, nipples discharging fluids other than breast milk, and swollen lymph nodes under your arm or around your collar bone. The ACS recommends contacting your doctor if you experience any of these symptoms.


MYTH: Breast cancer only happens to older women.

TRUTH: Breast cancer can develop in younger women, too, as well as men.

While your risk does increase with age, the NCI reports women in their 30s have a 1 in 208 chance of developing breast cancer. By the time a woman reaches her 40s, that risk has increased to 1 in 65. Overall, it’s estimated that 1 out of every 8 women in the United States will develop breast cancer at some point in her life.7

Breast cancer in men accounts for less than 1% of cases in the United States. However, the ACS says male breast cancer is on the rise.1 Unfortunately, a higher percentage of men are diagnosed with advanced-stage breast cancer, likely a result of less awareness and fewer early-detection screenings.

If you’ve been diagnosed with breast cancer and would like to learn more about proton therapy as a possible treatment, please visit our Proton Benefits page or contact a Care Coordinator.


MYTH: My family has no history of breast cancer, so I am not at risk.

TRUTH: While a family history of breast cancer does put you at greater risk, most women who develop breast cancer do not have a family history of the disease.1

According to the CDC, a family history of breast cancer may put you at higher risk for the disease, but is not indicative of whether you’ll actually develop cancer.2 In fact, the ACS says most women with one or more affected first-degree relatives (parents, siblings, children) will still never be diagnosed.

The CDC provides a table with examples of average, moderate and strong family health histories, along with suggestions for preventative measures each group can take. Regardless of your family history, the CDC recommends you get mammograms and other breast exams as recommended by your doctor, maintain a healthy weight and exercise regularly. As family history of breast cancer increases, genetic counseling becomes an option to test for hereditary breast cancer. Be sure to talk to your doctor about what screenings are best for you and when you should get them.


MYTH: A double mastectomy will eliminate my risk of breast cancer.

TRUTH: If the cancer is detected early enough, other treatment options can eliminate the cancer without removing the entire breast.

A mastectomy involves removing the entire breast and is typically performed when breast-conserving surgery (lumpectomy) is not an option. However, women with early-stage cancers can typically choose between the two types of surgeries. The ACS notes that while it’s normal for your gut reaction to be to “take out all the cancer as quickly as possible” with a mastectomy, the fact is that, most of the time, a lumpectomy combined with radiation therapy results in the same outcome.

Many patients at Provision CARES Proton Therapy choose to combine a lumpectomy with proton radiation therapy. Proton therapy for breast cancer treatment is non-invasive and painless, causing less cosmetic damage than conventional x-ray radiation. It is extremely precise and therefore more effective at targeting cancerous cells without causing damage to surrounding breast tissue. Because proton radiation has little to no impact on a patient’s energy level, quality of life during treatment is improved.

For women who do opt for a mastectomy, it’s important to remember that post-surgery treatment is still necessary. Even after removing the breast, there’s a small chance the cancer could recur on residual breast tissue or the chest wall. You should continue to perform self-breast exams and see your doctor on a regular basis.


MYTH: Antiperspirants and wire bras can cause breast cancer.

TRUTH: There has been no conclusive evidence linking antiperspirants or bras to breast cancer.

Rumors have swirled across the internet claiming underarm antiperspirants cause breast cancer. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) says the basis of these claims is the aluminum-based active ingredient in antiperspirants. Some scientists have suggested that absorbing these aluminum compounds into your skin could increase your risk factor for breast cancer.4 Still, no clear link has ever been established between antiperspirants and breast cancer. In fact, the NCI even cites a study from 2002 that concluded there is no increase in risk for breast cancer among women who reported using an underarm antiperspirant.3

Another rumor making its rounds across cyberspace is that wearing a wire bra can increase your risk of breast cancer. This myth was debunked by a 2014 study published by the American Association for Cancer Research. According to the authors, it had been suggested in the media that bras impede lymph circulation and drainage, interfering with the process of waste and toxin removal.6 However, the study concluded that wearing a bra had no effect on your risk of breast cancer.


Sources:

  1. Breast Cancer Facts & Figures 2017-2018. American Cancer Society. https://www.cancer.org/content/dam/cancer-org/research/cancer-facts-and-statistics/breast-cancer-facts-and-figures/breast-cancer-facts-and-figures-2017-2018.pdf
  2. Breast and Ovarian Cancer and Family History Risk Categories. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/genomics/disease/breast_ovarian_cancer/risk_categories.htm
  3. National Cancer Institute. Antiperspirants/Deodorants and Breast Cancer. https://www.cancer.org/cancer/cancer-causes/antiperspirants-and-breast-cancer-risk.html
  4. Darbre PD. Aluminium, antiperspirants and breast cancer.Journal of Inorganic Biochemistry 2005; 99(9):1912–1919. [PubMed Abstract]
  5. Mirick DK, Davis S, Thomas DB. Antiperspirant use and the risk of breast cancer.Journal of the National Cancer Institute 2002; 94(20):1578–1580. [PubMed Abstract]
  6. RayCC. Q and A – Bras and Cancer [Internet]. NY times; 2010 [cited 2013 Dec. 16]. Available from: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/16/science/16qna.html?ref=science.
  7. Howlader N, Noone AM, Krapcho M, et al. (eds). SEER Cancer Statistics Review, 1975-2016, National Cancer Institute. Bethesda, MD,https://seer.cancer.gov/csr/1975_2016/, based on November 2018 SEER data submission, posted to the SEER web site, April 2019.

 

Nurses Week 2018

Nurses Week 2018

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Content and information provided by Lindsay Chandler, RN, BSN, OCN Nursing Manager for Provision CARES Proton Therapy Knoxville

May 6-12 is a week of excellence for every nurse, and marks a time to acknowledge accomplishments, compassionate patient care and professionalism for the nursing society. The conclusion of Nurses Week is May 12th, in honor of the mother of nursing, Florence Nightingale. Florence Nightingale was born on May 12th, 1820, and she was the innovator of modern nursing. It was through her teaching, compassion, leadership and influence, that the world of nursing has evolved into what it is today.

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WE CAN. I CAN

World Cancer Day: Provision CARES Proton Therapy Impacts of Cancer Care in East Tennessee

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Provision has treated almost 2,000 patients with proton therapy in Knoxville, Tennessee. These patients traveled from all over the United States and the world to receive the most advanced form of cancer treatment. Proton therapy benefit from reduced side effects and improved quality of life compared to those who receive conventional radiation therapy or surgery.

Sunday, February 4th, is an important day in the eyes of many. Many people will be gathered with friends and family cheering on their favorite NFL team, watching the nation’s most expensive commercials, or snacking on chips and salsa. However, to Provision CARES Proton Therapy, February 4th means a lot more. It is World Cancer Day, a day to raise awareness about cancer and how it affects people and communities across the globe. (more…)

Provision is first in Knoxville and the state of Tennessee to achieve ASTRO’s APEx Accreditation Certificate

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After months of preparing and a thorough review process, we are proud to announce Provision CARES Proton Therapy-Knoxville is the first radiation facility in the state of Tennessee and the first private practice proton center to receive the official certificate of ASTRO’s Accreditation Program for Excellence (“APEx”).  APEx is an independent radiation oncology practice accreditation program developed by ASTRO, American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, based on a comprehensive set of sixteen evidence-based standards of radiation oncology practice.

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Breast cancer awareness—know your options

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Sometimes people just get the genetic short end of the stick, but you’d never know Tammy Coleman was one of those people.

Her upbeat personality and contagious enthusiasm belie two heart attacks, a stroke, congestive heart failure and complications related to high blood pressure. And that was all before she was diagnosed with breast cancer—something that ran in her family.

Genetic testing revealed her as the recipient of a genetic mutation that made it highly probable she would develop ovarian cancer too, so within one day Coleman received a double mastectomy and complete hysterectomy.

She had to do chemo, and doctors recommended radiation as well. Because of her existing health problems, particularly related to her heart condition, specialists recommended proton therapy. The targeted nature of protons allow for the benefit of radiation therapy without the collateral damage to surrounding healthy tissue in heart and lungs. (more…)

Whether a career change or cancer treatment, Bill Raffield is the kind of man who goes for what he wants.

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That included treatment for prostate cancer.

Raffleld started out with a B.S. in physics and a career in the Air Force where he planned and evaluated instructional systems for the military’s intercontinental ballistic missiles program during the Vietnam War. He became a captain, serving as combat crew commander and wing instructor and discovered he enjoyed “arranging resources to accomplish the mission,” he said. “At the time, I didn’t know what that was called, but in business, that’s operations.”

After his military career ended, Raffield didn’t settle into the field he had chosen but embarked in a new direction, starting out as a territory sales manager for Michelin Tire and ending up management and operations for Truckstops of America and Universal Tire.

“I tended to say, ‘I’m going to do what fits me,” he said. (more…)

Prostate cancer treatment: what you need to know

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When it comes to prostate cancer treatment, there’s bad news and there’s good news.

The bad news: Prostate cancer ranks the third most common cancer in the U.S. Healthcare providers diagnose more than 200,000 new cases each year. Approximately 14 percent of men will succumb to prostate cancer in their lifetimes. The good news: Most diagnosed with prostate cancer survive. The disease represents 13.3 percent of all new cancer cases. But only 4.7 percent of those diagnosed will die of the disease. Research shows five-year relative survival rates for prostate cancer at 99.7 percent. (National Cancer Institute)

And, proton therapy offers a treatment option for prostate cancer with many fewer short-term and long-term side effects. (more…)