Casey rings the victory bell after completing cancer treatment at Provision CARES Proton Therapy Knoxville

Surviving Breast Cancer (Part 4)

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Casey’s Story: Ringing the Bell

Casey is a two-time breast cancer survivor who is sharing her experience during her proton therapy treatments at Provision CARES Proton Therapy Knoxville. Catch up on her story first by reading parts one, two and three of her blog series.


There is something about ringing that bell at Provision CARES Proton Therapy Center.

After my final radiation therapy treatment, my friends, family and co-workers gathered around me  as I rang the bell three times, symbolizing an end to treatment and a new beginning to a cancer-free life.

Victory.  Celebration.  Gratefulness.

It takes time to actually realize that the most difficult journey in my life is really going to be over soon and it will be time to be well again.  I remember my brother Pete telling me at this exact time last year, “Winter never lasts forever and Spring never skips its turn.”  I thought about his words every single day.

Something very valuable I learned during my journey:  choose your providers very carefully.  Do your research in every way possible.  As a Care Coordinator, I would always tell a prospective patient that they owed it to themselves to learn about and evaluate several  treatment facilities before choosing where they would receive their care.  This thought process served me well during every step of my journey.

Without the care of Dr. Brig and his amazing staff at Brig Center for Cancer Care, my surgeon Dr. Danielle Duchini and the entire staff at Provision CARES Proton Therapy, I would not be where I am today.  I am well on my way to health and wellness and beating breast cancer.

I will be forever grateful to so many people and hope to pay it forward for as long as I can.


Provision CARES Proton Therapy would like to thank Casey for sharing her story. Please visit our website to learn more about the benefits of proton therapy for breast cancer and read other patient success stories.

Lung Cancer Awareness Month

Lung Cancer awareness efforts focus on smoking prevention

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Lung Cancer Awareness Month is dedicated to educating the public about the prevalence of the disease in the United States, and providing resources on prevention, screening and treatment.

According to the American Cancer Society (ACS), lung cancer will kill more than 140,000 people in 2019, making it by far the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women. It is the second most common cancer in both men and women (not counting skin cancer). For men, prostate cancer is the only cancer more common, while in women breast cancer is more common.

Smoking is the leading cause of lung cancer. The ACS reports 80% of lung cancer deaths are caused by smoking.1 However, non-smokers can also develop the disease. This could be caused by exposure to radon, secondhand smoke, air pollution, asbestos, diesel exhaust or other chemicals.

PREVENTION IS KEY

With such a high percentage of lung cancer cases linked to smoking, efforts to reduce the prevalence of the disease are largely focused on kicking the tobacco habit.

“Smoking continues to be the #1 most preventable cause of death and disease in the U.S.,” says Kerri Thompson, Public Health Educator for the Knox County Health Department (KCHD) in Knoxville, Tenn. “It kills so many people and it’s something that can be prevented.”

Thompson spearheads KCHD’s tobacco prevention programs, which focus on three main areas: Youth Prevention, Secondhand Smoke Reduction and Smoking Cessation (quitting). Through educational programs designed to teach children about the dangers of smoking, KCHD hopes to dramatically reduce tobacco product usage in our next generation.

“We’re trying to change the trajectory so, hopefully, we can have an impact on lung cancer,” Thompson notes. “Having (our youth) not use tobacco or not be addicted to nicotine in the first place is really key to addressing the huge impact that smoking has on society.”

Knox County’s programs aimed at youth education actually have a trickle-down effect, impacting its Secondhand Smoke Reduction and Smoking Cessation efforts, as well. Children tend to share resources they receive in school with their parents in hopes they will then try to quit. One of these resources is the Tennessee Tobacco Quitline. This is a free service that offers personalized support from counselors who are trained to help you kick the habit. More resources to help you quit smoking can be found at Smokefree.gov.

When it comes to quitting, Thompson says relapse is common, so persistence is very important. “When someone quits smoking, on average it takes seven to 10 times for someone to quit for good. Many people think since they’ve been smoking for years, the damage is already done, so what’s the point in quitting.” However, if there’s one thing she hopes people take away from Knox County’s education and prevention efforts, it’s this – “It’s never too late to quit.”

LUNG CANCER SCREENING CAN SAVE LIVES

According to the National Cancer Institute (NCI), risk factors for lung cancer include tobacco use, secondhand smoke, family history, HIV infection and environmental risks like exposure to asbestos, radon  or other substances. If you believe you may be at risk for lung cancer, you should start by speaking to your doctor. A general practitioner can perform an assessment, then offer advice for your next step. This could be a referral to a pulmonologist or oncologist, or a prescription for nicotine replacement therapy. Since early detection is so important, at-risk individuals may also benefit from a lung cancer screening.

The NCI says the most effective type of screening is a low-dose spiral Computed Tomography (CT) scan. In its National Lung Screening Trial, the NCI studied people between 55 and 74 years old who had smoked at least one pack of cigarettes a day for 30 years or more. They compared low-dose spiral CT scans with another type of screening, chest x-rays. Researchers observed a 20% lower risk of dying from lung cancer in people who received low-dose spiral CT scan screenings.2

Fortunately, there are resources available to help people get screened. The American Lung Association (ALA) offers an online quiz to help you determine whether you are at risk. The ALA can also help you find information about insurance coverage and screening facilities near you.

In an effort to make lung cancer screenings more accessible, CHI Memorial Hospital in Chattanooga, Tenn. brings low-dose CT scans into the community with its Breathe Easy mobile lung CT coach. The bus serves counties from three different states in the Southeast.

PROTON THERAPY AS A TREATMENT

Given the serious prognosis of lung cancer, it’s important to evaluate all your treatment options before making any decisions. Treatment for lung cancer is based mainly on the type (non-small cell vs. small cell) and the stage of the cancer. Other factors like a person’s health and lung function should also be considered. Treatment options may include surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy.

Doctors and scientists have been studying the results of proton therapy in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). One study in particular showed that patients with Stage 3 NSCLC who were treated with proton therapy experienced lower rates of lung and esophagus inflammation compared to patients treated with traditional (x-ray/IMRT) radiation.3

Proton therapy for lung cancer treatment is non-invasive and usually painless. Physicians provide doses of radiation to specific areas, controlling the depth of the protons emitted and reducing the impact on the surrounding tissue. Provision CARES Proton Therapy uses a technique known as pencil beam scanning, which provides precise dose of radiation to targeted areas, resulting in a decreased risk of side effects. Proton therapy decreases the risk of damage to healthy tissue and organs surrounding the cancer. This is because the unique physical properties of protons allow the radiation dose to better conform to your cancer, avoiding unnecessary radiation to nearby areas. This is especially important for lung cancer treatment because the tumor may be close to your heart, healthy lung and other critical organs.

Since each cancer diagnosis is unique, we encourage anyone seeking treatment options to speak with one of our Cancer Care Experts to see if proton therapy is right for you.

 

Sources

  1. American Cancer Society. What Causes Lung Cancer? Read More
  2. National Cancer Institute. National Lung Screening Trial. Read More
  3. National Cancer Database Analysis of Proton Versus Photon Radiaion Therapy in NSCLC. Read More
  4. American Cancer Society. Key Statistics for Lung Cancer. Read More
  5. Proton Beam Radiotherapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy for Unresectable Stage III Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer Final Results of a Phase 2 Study. Read More
  6. High-dose hypofractionated proton beam radiation therapy is safe and effective for central and peripheral early-stage non-small cell lung cancer: results of a 12-year experience at Loma Linda University Medical Center. Fractionation 10 for PBT vs 6-8 weeks for IMRT. Read More

 

Teeing Off for Cancer Patients – Bill Williamson Memorial Golf Tournament 2018

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Content provided by Les Fout, Ph.D. – Executive Director at Provision CARES Foundation.

 

The 4th Annual Bill Williamson Memorial Golf Tournament was held on Friday, June 15th at Avalon Golf & Country Club. Proceeds from the tournament benefit Provision CARES Foundation which serves more than 1,600 families battling cancer per year in East Tennessee.

The tournament had both morning and afternoon rounds, was completely sold out, and had more than 210 golfers.

Approximately $50,000 in net proceeds will be raised as a result of this great tournament. (more…)

04-12-18_VolunteerAppreciation

Volunteer Appreciation in the “Volunteer State”

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This week, April 15-21, Provision will celebrate Volunteer Appreciation Week by honoring our very own Proton Volunteer, Mrs. Sue. Sue and her husband retired to Knoxville from Washington, DC in 2001. She has been a volunteer for Provision CARES Proton Therapy Knoxville since 2016 and has been filling the proton center with extra joy and smiles ever since. (more…)

WE CAN. I CAN

World Cancer Day: Provision CARES Proton Therapy Impacts of Cancer Care in East Tennessee

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Provision has treated almost 2,000 patients with proton therapy in Knoxville, Tennessee. These patients traveled from all over the United States and the world to receive the most advanced form of cancer treatment. Proton therapy benefit from reduced side effects and improved quality of life compared to those who receive conventional radiation therapy or surgery.

Sunday, February 4th, is an important day in the eyes of many. Many people will be gathered with friends and family cheering on their favorite NFL team, watching the nation’s most expensive commercials, or snacking on chips and salsa. However, to Provision CARES Proton Therapy, February 4th means a lot more. It is World Cancer Day, a day to raise awareness about cancer and how it affects people and communities across the globe. (more…)

Innovative Cancer Treatment in Knoxville, TN

Celebrating the Four-Year Anniversary of the Most Innovative Cancer Treatment in the World and Available in Knoxville, Tennessee!

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Many online blogs tell us the traditional 4th anniversary gift is flowers or fruit, but at Provision CARES Proton Therapy, we prefer cake! January 20th marks the 4th anniversary of operation for Provision CARES Proton Therapy Knoxville (PCPTK) providing the most innovative cancer treatment in the world, proton therapy.

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Dowell Springs Campus

History of Dowell Springs

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The Lonas Family Legacy

“Many prayers were said over this land. That it would be used for something beneficial for our community and that it would be a blessing to all who visit…” Dowell Springs is a special place for many people in our community and visitors from near and far. Not only is the campus home to the Historic Lonas farmhouse, it is home to Provision CARES Proton Therapy. The beauty of the property and the magnificent views from the buildings bring a calm and healing atmosphere to all visit.  (more…)

Dale C. Prostate Cancer

Proton Stories: Why Dale Chose Proton Therapy

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Dale C. first heard about Provision CARES Proton Therapy through a TV commercial. Not knowing he had cancer, he tucked the words “proton therapy” in the back of his mind, hoping that he would never have to remember them. It was February 2015 when he learned he had prostate cancer. Dale had always been proactive when it came to his health. He said, “my mom always taught me to be proactive.” He went in for regular checkups, yearly physicals, and was well aware of his PSA and gleason score. At his appointment in 2015, all test scores came back normal, but he insisted on a biopsy, just to be sure. Both the doctor and Clayton were shocked, his biopsy came back positive. Dale was diagnosed with low risk, non-aggressive prostate cancer and decided on active surveillance.

Two and a half years later, things started to change. His PSA remained normal but his biopsy showed the cancer had doubled in size. “It’s a miracle we found it,” said Dale. “I believe God placed the right doctors, urologists, and friends around me to help me make an informed treatment decision.” He researched prostate cancer and treatment options, from surgery to brachytherapy to protons, and there were two things that were very significant to his treatment decision process: Cure Rate and Quality of Life.

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Provision is first in Knoxville and the state of Tennessee to achieve ASTRO’s APEx Accreditation Certificate

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After months of preparing and a thorough review process, we are proud to announce Provision CARES Proton Therapy-Knoxville is the first radiation facility in the state of Tennessee and the first private practice proton center to receive the official certificate of ASTRO’s Accreditation Program for Excellence (“APEx”).  APEx is an independent radiation oncology practice accreditation program developed by ASTRO, American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, based on a comprehensive set of sixteen evidence-based standards of radiation oncology practice.

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Breast cancer awareness—know your options

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Sometimes people just get the genetic short end of the stick, but you’d never know Tammy Coleman was one of those people.

Her upbeat personality and contagious enthusiasm belie two heart attacks, a stroke, congestive heart failure and complications related to high blood pressure. And that was all before she was diagnosed with breast cancer—something that ran in her family.

Genetic testing revealed her as the recipient of a genetic mutation that made it highly probable she would develop ovarian cancer too, so within one day Coleman received a double mastectomy and complete hysterectomy.

She had to do chemo, and doctors recommended radiation as well. Because of her existing health problems, particularly related to her heart condition, specialists recommended proton therapy. The targeted nature of protons allow for the benefit of radiation therapy without the collateral damage to surrounding healthy tissue in heart and lungs. (more…)