Healthy Recipes for the Holidays from Provision

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‘Tis the season for gathering with friends and family to enjoy festivities and food! It takes a little planning, but it is definitely still possible to eat food that nourishes your body during the holidays. Here are some healthy recipes of holiday favorites to try this year!

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Fight Cancer with Your Fork

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Content and information provided by Casey Coffey, MS, RD, LDN at Provision CARES Proton Therapy.

A nutritionally balanced diet is very important anytime, especially during and after cancer treatment. Consider planning your meals using a balanced plate approach. Eating meals with a balanced plate is a valuable tool to control your portion intake of the different food groups. While each section of a balanced plate is important, your body needs more of some and less of others.

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Breast Cancer Fighting Nutrients and Where to Find Them

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Each year, thousands of people are diagnosed with breast cancer. In fact, one in eight women will be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime. However, with today’s knowledge and resources, cancer diagnoses are gradually becoming fewer and fewer.

While cancer is not preventable, today’s nutritional science shows that a strategic diet can be one of the biggest factors in minimizing the risk of breast cancer. That’s right — research has repeatedly shown that certain foods can act as preventative medicines. In fact, changing what you eat and how you exercise can prevent up to 30% of breast cancer diagnoses.

No food item can prohibit cancerous cells from developing, but there are a few that can significantly lower the risks of developing cancer. Foods high in fiber, like beans, nuts, and whole wheat bread can help lower amounts of estrogen, reducing the risk of breast cancer. Additionally, foods like salmon, walnuts, and oysters can help produce Omega-3s, essential fatty acids that aren’t produced naturally in the body. These fatty acids help with inflammation, which can easily damage healthy tissue. Sulforaphane, found in arugula, cabbage, and broccoli, and carotenoids, found in carrots, tomatoes, and sweet potatoes, have both been found to reduce the risk of breast cancer in increased levels.

While no one cancer case is the same, those who have increased intakes of these types of foods and nutrients have been shown to have an overall lower risk of developing breast cancer. A well-balanced diet and exercise routine is important for a lot of things: physical strength, heart and organ health, and mental health.

This goes to show that the food you choose to eat and how you treat your body has more of an impact than people may originally think. Continue reading to learn more about what specific foods and nutrients can help thwart a breast cancer diagnosis.

breast cancer fighting nutrients

National “Eat Your Veggies” Day – June 17th

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Content and information provided by Casey Coffey, MS, RD, LDN at Provision CARES Proton Therapy.

With National “Eat Your Veggies” Day just around the corner, we wanted to give some advice when trying to incorporate more vegetables into your meals!

Most people do not realize that they’re not including nearly enough vegetables in their diet. On top of including vegetables in your diet, it’s important to realize that all vegetables aren’t created equal.

We like to encourage everyone to fill ½ of their plate with nutrient rich non-starchy vegetables in a range of color. Non-starchy vegetables contain very little naturally occurring sugar and are rich in fiber making them slow to digest. These nutrient dense colorful delights are packed with vitamins and minerals that are necessary for growth, restoration/repair, metabolic processes that occur at the cellular level. They also have magnificent cancer fighting properties! Some of our favorite non-starchy vegetables are below: (more…)

Healthy Memorial Day Weekend Recipe: Layered Chicken Taco Salad

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Looking for a healthy dish to take to your Memorial Day cookout? Look no further than Casey’s Layered Chicken Taco Salad!

Recipe provided by Casey Coffey MS, RD, LDN Registered Dietician for Provision CARES Proton Therapy Knoxville.

Layered Chicken Taco Salad

Prep time:  20 minutes       Total time:  20 minutes

Serves:  8-10 people

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups chopped romaine lettuce
  • 1 cup riced cauliflower
  • 1 (15 ounce) can black, drained and rinsed
  • 1 (11 ounce) can Mexican corn, drained
  • 1 large avocado, diced
  • 1 ½ cups prepared pico de gallo (or diced tomato)
  • 1 rotisserie chicken, shredded (about 4 cups shredded meat) – can use canned chicken if preferred
  • 1 ½ cups shredded Monterey jack and cheddar chceese
  • 1 (14 ounce) bottle cilantro avocado yogurt dressing (about 1.75 cups dressing) (Bolthouse brand is good) – could also use ranch dressing of choice and add ¼ cup chopped cilantro
  • 1 (3.5 ounce) package tortilla strips (about 1 ½ cups) – tri-color is a great option for Memorial Day

Instructions:

  1. Layer half of each ingredient into a large salad bowl in the order listed above. Repeat layers with remaining half of the ingredients.
  2. Serve immediately or cover with plastic and store in the refrigerator until ready to serve. Leftovers can be stored in refrigerator for 2-3 days.
03-22-CauliflowerStirFry

Fighting Cancer with Your Fork Recipe of the Month: Cauliflower Rice with Vegetable Stir-Fry

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Content and information provided by Casey Coffey MS, RD, LDN Registered Dietician for Provision CARES Proton Therapy Knoxville

Yield:  4 servings

Ingredients:

  • 1 package riced cauliflower (you can find this at Trader Joe’s or Kroger in the produce section)
  • 2 carrots, chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, thinly sliced
  • 1 medium red bell pepper, cored, seeded and chopped
  • 1 vidalia onion, chopped or thinly sliced
  • ¼ teaspoon black pepper
  • 2 cups snow peas, trimmed
  • ½ teaspoon sea salt, divided
  • 2 Tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 1 Tablespoon soy sauce (or Bragg liquid aminos)

Instructions:

  1. Heat olive oil in pan and sauté carrots, stirring occasionally, until softened, about 1 minute.
  2. Add bell pepper and onion, ¼ teaspoon salt, and garlic; cook, stirring frequently, about 2 minutes.
  3. Add peas, sprinkle with remaining ¼ teaspoon salt and pepper and cook, stirring frequently, 1 minute.
  4. Place cooked vegetables in bowl and set aside while preparing cauliflower.
  5. Return skillet to head; add sesame oil, cauliflower and beaten eggs.
  6. Cook, stirring constantly, until eggs are evenly cooked and cauliflower has softened, about 2-4 minutes.
  7. Add cooked vegetables and soy sauce to cauliflower / egg mixture; cook 1 minute more or until warm through.
  8. Divide stir-fry among 4 bowls.
  9. Enjoy!!

Note: Stir fry chicken, shrimp or tofu with above to complete your meal.

9 Tips to Prevent Cancer

9 Tips to Reduce Your Risk of Cancer

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“If we could give every individual the right amount of nourishment and exercise, not too little and not too much, we would have found the safest way to health.” – Hippocrates

February is National Cancer Prevention Month and Provision CARES Proton Therapy is dedicated to providing educational awareness on cancer prevention and early detection. Along with regular screenings and physician check-ups, maintaining a healthy lifestyle is one of the main ways to reduce your risk of cancer. There is no single food or food substance that can fully prevent or cure cancer.  However, there are a number of lifestyle adjustments you can do on your own to reduce the risk of cancer. A number of foods are rich in nutrients and provide long-term benefits to the body. Adopting a healthy lifestyle that promotes a healthy weight, a balanced plant-based diet, and movement on a regular basis is proven to reduce your risk for some cancers(more…)

Mediterranean Diet to Reduce Lung Cancer

Reduce the risk of lung cancer with Mediterranean diet

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Replacing saturated fat with polyunsaturated fat impacts reduce risk of lung cancer

By Casey Coffey MS, RD, LDN

According to recent studies, benefits of polyunsaturated fats have been widely reviewed by looking at the relationship between dietary components of the Mediterranean diet and cancer risk, diabetes, cardiovascular events, and Alzheimer’s disease. Within these studies, the primary conclusion shows correlation between fat intake and risk associated with lung cancer.

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Growing a healthy whole

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We have talked about the entire Wheel of Life in this blog series. Have you placed a number on each of the topics as to where you are in your life? Our first topic was Fitness, followed by Nutrition, Restoration, Peace, Finances and then your Career. Finally, we wrap it all up with a look at Personal Growth. (more…)