Risk Factors for Prostate Cancer

Risk Factors for Prostate Cancer can increase due to Age, Race and Family History

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Early detection of cancer can be the next best thing to prevention. There are several widely known risk factors for prostate cancer that may increase the probability of a man to develop prostate cancer. Age, race and family history are the most common today. According to ASCO Cancer.Net, “Prostate cancer that runs in a family, called familial prostate cancer, occurs about 20% of the time.” Sources say that shared genes, similar lifestyles and environments play a role in developing familial prostate cancer. Hereditary prostate cancer accounts for almost 5% of cases. This type of gene mutation is passed down within family generations. A few characteristics for hereditary prostate cancer could include:

Dowell Springs Campus

History of Dowell Springs

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The Lonas Family Legacy

“Many prayers were said over this land. That it would be used for something beneficial for our community and that it would be a blessing to all who visit…” Dowell Springs is a special place for many people in our community and visitors from near and far. Not only is the campus home to the Historic Lonas farmhouse, it is home to Provision CARES Proton Therapy. The beauty of the property and the magnificent views from the buildings bring a calm and healing atmosphere to all visit. 

Dale C. Prostate Cancer

Proton Stories: Dale C.

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Dale Clayton first heard about Provision CARES Proton Therapy through a TV commercial. Not knowing he had cancer, he tucked the words “proton therapy” in the back of his mind, hoping that he would never have to remember them. It was February 2015 when Mr. Clayton learned he had prostate cancer. Dale had always been proactive when it came to his health. He said, “my mom always taught me to be proactive.” He went in for regular checkups, yearly physicals, and was well aware of his PSA and gleason score. At his appointment in 2015, all test scores came back normal, but he insisted on a biopsy, just to be sure. Both the doctor and Clayton were shocked, his biopsy came back positive. Dale was diagnosed with low risk, non-aggressive prostate cancer and decided on active surveillance.

Two and a half years later, things started to change. His PSA remained normal but his biopsy showed the cancer had doubled in size. “It’s a miracle we found it,” said Clayton, “I believe God placed the right doctors, urologists, and friends around me to help me make an informed treatment decision.” He researched prostate cancer and treatment options, from surgery to brachytherapy to protons, and there were two things that were very significant to his treatment decision process:

  1. Cure Rate
  2. Quality of Life

Protons perfect treatment choice for pediatric cancer

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They have come from as close as down the road and as far away as China. Their cases have ranged from highly curable to palliative care. They light up lobby with laugher and courage. And they most clearly show cancer for the monstrosity it is.

September is Pediatric Cancer Awareness Month.

Whether a career change or cancer treatment, Bill Raffield is the kind of man who goes for what he wants.

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That included treatment for prostate cancer.

Raffleld started out with a B.S. in physics and a career in the Air Force where he planned and evaluated instructional systems for the military’s intercontinental ballistic missiles program during the Vietnam War. He became a captain, serving as combat crew commander and wing instructor and discovered he enjoyed “arranging resources to accomplish the mission,” he said. “At the time, I didn’t know what that was called, but in business, that’s operations.”

After his military career ended, Raffield didn’t settle into the field he had chosen but embarked in a new direction, starting out as a territory sales manager for Michelin Tire and ending up management and operations for Truckstops of America and Universal Tire.

“I tended to say, ‘I’m going to do what fits me,” he said.

Week promotes sarcoma awareness

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Sarcoma is a relatively rare but troublesome cancer that affects soft tissue throughout the body. As a former Provision patient who was treated for the cancer put it: “There’s isn’t a ‘buddy check’ for sarcoma.”

Minorities suffer disproportionately from cancer

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It wasn’t until after Tammy Coleman’s grandfather died that she knew he had prostate cancer. And then a beloved cousin died before Tammy learned of her breast cancer diagnosis. And so it went.

“It’s like a hush-hush thing,” said Coleman, who as a breast cancer survivor—and Provision patient— has become heavily involved in local cancer awareness and fundraising efforts. “You don’t even know they have cancer. They just die one day.”

It is a lethal silence.

Patient with oral cancer finds hope in proton therapy

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This is Oral, Head and Neck Cancer Awareness Week. Click here to learn more about these types of cancer.

Before her cancer diagnosis, Holly Caster worked in hospitality at Beaumont Hospital in her Michigan hometown, coming up with creative ways to make patients’ stays more comfortable.

There was the flash mob she planned for a high school senior who’d been hospitalized and couldn’t go to prom. The laptop, CDs and company-keeping for a young pregnant woman confined to bed rest whose family lived 50 miles away. She gave cancer patients afghans in their favorite color. She planned in-hospital celebrations for weddings and anniversaries and new babies, all to help people cope as best they could when life dished up the unexpected.

Then the unexpected happened to her.