03-22-CauliflowerStirFry

Fighting Cancer with Your Fork Recipe of the Month: Cauliflower Rice with Vegetable Stir-Fry

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Content and information provided by Casey Coffey MS, RD, LDN Registered Dietician for Provision CARES Proton Therapy Knoxville

Yield:  4 servings

Ingredients:

  • 1 package riced cauliflower (you can find this at Trader Joe’s or Kroger in the produce section)
  • 2 carrots, chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, thinly sliced
  • 1 medium red bell pepper, cored, seeded and chopped
  • 1 vidalia onion, chopped or thinly sliced
  • ¼ teaspoon black pepper
  • 2 cups snow peas, trimmed
  • ½ teaspoon sea salt, divided
  • 2 Tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 1 Tablespoon soy sauce (or Bragg liquid aminos)

Instructions:

  1. Heat olive oil in pan and sauté carrots, stirring occasionally, until softened, about 1 minute.
  2. Add bell pepper and onion, ¼ teaspoon salt, and garlic; cook, stirring frequently, about 2 minutes.
  3. Add peas, sprinkle with remaining ¼ teaspoon salt and pepper and cook, stirring frequently, 1 minute.
  4. Place cooked vegetables in bowl and set aside while preparing cauliflower.
  5. Return skillet to head; add sesame oil, cauliflower and beaten eggs.
  6. Cook, stirring constantly, until eggs are evenly cooked and cauliflower has softened, about 2-4 minutes.
  7. Add cooked vegetables and soy sauce to cauliflower / egg mixture; cook 1 minute more or until warm through.
  8. Divide stir-fry among 4 bowls.
  9. Enjoy!!

Note: Stir fry chicken, shrimp or tofu with above to complete your meal.

What is Lymphedema

Lymphedema Awareness Month

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What is Lymphedema? And What Does it Mean for my Cancer Diagnosis

Content and information provided by Kathy Kearse, PT, CLT-LANA

To understand Lymphedema and to honor lymphedema awareness month, let’s talk first about the Lymphatic System.  Most people have heard of the Circulatory System, which consists of the heart, arteries, and veins. The lesser known Lymphatic System is a one-way system of vessels, which runs parallel to the blood vessels, starting in the tissue spaces throughout the body (skin, muscle, organs, etc.) and ending at large veins close to the heart.  (more…)

New proton therapy cancer center to open across from Williamson Medical Center

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A cancer treatment center specializing in proton therapy, an increasingly popular treatment, is set to open in the summer of 2018.

Provision Healthcare, a clinical provider and developer of cancer treatments, will open a Provision CARES Cancer Center on Carothers Parkway, across from Williamson Medical Center, said Dr. Terry Douglass, Ph.D., the executive chair of Provision.

Proton therapy, said Douglass, is a form of advanced radiation technology that impairs the DNA of cancer cells and causes them to die.

Unlike traditional radiation methods, a machine called a cyclotron is used to pinpoint cancer cells, targeting diseased cells while minimizing damage to surrounding tissue.

“It’s like using a rifle compared to a shotgun,” Douglass said of the therapy.

“We developed a new technology that is a lower cost, that uses smaller and lighter technology,” Douglass said of the 200-ton machine which is used to treat cancer.

In traditional chemotherapy or radiation techniques, side effects are common. But with proton therapy, Douglass said side effects are less pronounced; he also said numerous data support the use of proton therapy, including better long-term outcomes for patients.

The treatment is becoming more common for illnesses like prostate cancer, but studies show mixed results, not conclusively supporting the treatment as better than traditional radiation.

Proton therapy centers are popping up across the country. According to the National Association of Proton Therapy, there are currently 26 proton therapy centers in operation with 11 under construction or in development.

The Franklin location will be the company’s second center in Tennessee. The original campus opened in January of 2014 in Knoxville. Planned expansions in Fort Lauderdale and Orlando, Florida, are in the works, said Douglass.

Of the decision to be based in Franklin, Douglass said the surrounding health care centers and climate of technological innovation made it a good choice, noting Tennessee Oncology and Vanderbilt as two top-notch cancer treatment centers.

Douglass said the spot on Carothers Parkway, in a central location with easy access to the interstate, would make it easy for patients from Tennessee, as well as Kentucky and Alabama, to reach the center.

“These patients are here from four to eight weeks. They get five treatments Monday through Friday, then they have the weekend off,” he said. “We were looking for a site that would be amenable to the patients.”

“Being near the Williamson County Medical Center was very important to us as well,” he continued. “Franklin has just become a hub of healthcare services.”

In addition to the center, the company will build 72,000 square feet of office space, which Douglass said will house medical companies including Tennessee Oncology and drug discovery and trials for the Sarah Cannon Cancer Center.

Mary Lou DuBois, the president of Provision Health Partners, said the location will open some time this summer, and will hire 75 to 80 employees to staff the center.

“We’re about developing a culture of care that is totally focused on the patient and walking through and with them as they’re on their journey,” she said of center’s mission.

In 2005, Provision Healthcare was founded by Douglass in Knoxville. The organization operates as a for-profit healthcare solutions company, while both the Knoxville and Franklin cancer centers are non-profits.

“New proton therapy cancer center to open across from Williamson Medical Center.” Brooke Wanser, Brentwood HomePage

It’s like NASA landed in Franklin: Proton-therapy center nears completion

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After nearly two years of construction, Provision CARES Proton Therapy Nashville is nearing completion of its $100 million cancer-treatment center — minus some areas of the roof.

That’s because crews still need to lower a 28-foot-diameter gantry — a structure about the size of an above-ground pool that rotates around a patient during therapy, allowing treatment from different angles —into place at the 45,000-square-foot facility.

PHOTO BY JOEL STINNETT

It will be the second center for Knoxville-based Provision CARES, which provides proton-radiation treatment for cancer patients. The Franklin campus will also include a 72,000-square-foot medical office building at the cost of $18 million. Both buildings are being funded by tax-exempt bonds issued by the Williamson County Industrial Development Board and are expected to be completed in the summer of 2018.

The gantry, however, is relatively light lifting over at the 11-acre site. In July, a 220-ton particle accelerator, almost the same weight as the Statue of Liberty, was delivered to the facility. Rod Manning, service and maintenance manager at Provision CARES subsidiary ProNova Solutions, said the massive piece of equipment, called a cyclotron, was lowered into place by a 440-ton crane, the largest in Tennessee.

“It’s like NASA landed in Franklin,” Manning said.

Proton therapy delivers a high dose of radiation through a beam and, according to Provision CARES Director of Medical Physics Marc Blakey, has fewer side effects than traditional X-ray radiation.

Blakey said he can plot exactly where cancer is in the body and attack it while sparing surrounding tissue.

“The beam enters and only goes as deep as the tumor. It doesn’t exit the body,” Blakey said. “This allows for a higher dose because we can avoid critical structures.”

The cyclotron acts as the engine in the process, producing beams of protons into one of three gantries enclosed with two-meter thick doors made of lead-reinforced concrete. Most treatments only last a few minutes; Blakey said the center could facilitate up to 90 patients a day.

The two-story building will also house work areas for Gilda’s Club of Tennessee and Scott Hamilton CARES Foundation. Hamilton is on the board at Provision CARES and will have an office at the center.

Tara Mullaney, vice president at Provision CARES, said the inside of the building is designed to feel like a hotel more than a medical facility. Each dressing room will be outfitted with TVs and will have their own themes. The waiting room will a kids play area and a large bell to be rung every time a patient completes the entirety of their treatment.

“Cancer patients are going through enough so we want to make them as comfortable as possible,” Mullaney said. “They are coming here every day so they get to know the staff and feel welcomed.”

Mullaney said that while proton treatment isn’t new — the first center opened in the 1990s — it’s still not widely known. She said that’s because the initial investment for equipment is so high and not all insurance plans cover the therapy, where treatment costs about $2,000 per visit.

The word, however, is spreading, Mullaney said. The Franklin facility will be the 26th proton-treatment center in the nation, up from 13 five years ago, and Provision CARES has plans to build three more centers, she said. Those will be in Orlando, New Orleans and China.

Mullaney said ProNova, a Provision subsidiary, is also designing ways to decrease the size of equipment, therefore making it less expensive to access proton treatment.

“We are always thinking of ways to get better,” Mullaney said. “Franklin costs considerably less than the center in Knoxville because of the reduction in size of equipment and smaller footprint.”

“It’s like NASA landed in Franklin:’ Proton-therapy center nears completion.” Joel Stinnett, Nashville Business Journal

Mediterranean Diet to Reduce Lung Cancer

Reduce the risk of lung cancer with Mediterranean diet

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Replacing saturated fat with polyunsaturated fat impacts reduce risk of lung cancer

By Casey Coffey MS, RD, LDN

According to recent studies, benefits of polyunsaturated fats have been widely reviewed by looking at the relationship between dietary components of the Mediterranean diet and cancer risk, diabetes, cardiovascular events, and Alzheimer’s disease. Within these studies, the primary conclusion shows correlation between fat intake and risk associated with lung cancer.

(more…)

Relationships feed healthy lives

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Relationships come in all forms and sizes, positive and negative. Think about family—spouse, children, parents, crazy Aunt Sally, or boring Uncle Bob, friends, co-workers, school-mates, neighbors, people you’re church or clubs, teachers, the list goes on and on. There are close personal ties and distant peripheral acquaintances. But all come together in our lives to influence us one way or another and vice versa, we influence them. Close relationships help to form who we are and who we become. When they are safe, intimate, healthy relationships, both persons are encouraged to grow into who God created them to be. What are some characteristics of such a relationship? How do we foster these? How do we impact those around us? (more…)

The bank account needs to be healthy too

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So, we’ve talked about Fitness, Nutrition, Restoration and Peace on our Wheel of Life. Today we are going to talk about Finances. Wheels must be balanced on all sides to run evenly. Balanced finances help life roll along smoothly. A balanced financial plan helps with peace in our lives. Our relationship with money is ever-evolving. It’s never too late to start. (more…)

Say ‘no thanks’ to artificial sweeteners

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Part 2 of a two-part series on sugar and sugar substitutes.

Diet. Sugar-free. Low-calorie. These are the buzzwords you’ll find on drinks, desserts, drink mixes, cereals, breath mints, chewable vitamins, toothpaste, cough syrup, and other processed foods crowding grocery store shelves. Many people turn to artificial sweeteners trying to avoid extra calories and excess sugar.

BUT, and it’s a big one, just because calories are reduced doesn’t make them safe for consumption, and you will still be left craving more sweets. These products may contain aspartame, high fructose corn syrup (HFCS), Stevia or sugar alcohols to name a few. (more…)

Safe sugars: Is there such a thing?

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Part 1 of a 2-part series on sugar and sugar substitutes.

The holidays are quickly approaching! It starts with Halloween candy, then on to Thanksgiving and Christmas parties and beyond to New Year’s Day! My point is not how fast time is going, but what about our sugar intake? If we are trying to be healthy and EAT CLEAN, what does this mean about sugar in our food? (more…)

Eating clean 101

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Are you eating clean? What does that mean? Does it mean you’ve washed your food or your hands? Bought organic or grass-fed? Why is it important?

Here’s the truth: Clean eating is the concept of eating whole unprocessed foods, the way nature delivers them. It’s not a diet, it’s a lifestyle. It’s being mindful of food and how it’s prepared one meal at a time.  (more…)