Provision CARES Proton Therapy Orlando announces arrival of cyclotron in Hamlin development

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WINTER GARDEN, Fla. — Provision CARES Proton Therapy Orlando is under construction in the Hamlin development in Southwest Orange County. The center will offer one of the most promising new cancer therapies available, proton therapy; and will utilize the latest advancement in proton therapy systems, the ProNova SC360 manufactured by ProNova Solutions, LLC located in Maryville, Tennessee.

On Wednesday, November 20, one of the key components of the proton therapy system, the cyclotron, will travel from Cape Canaveral to Hamlin on a flatbed truck along a FDOT pre-approved route. The cyclotron travel time is expected to take approximately four hours before arrival at Hamlin. The cyclotron generates the proton beam that is used to treat patients through the ProNova SC360 system. Delivery of the cyclotron is a milestone event in the construction of the proton therapy treatment center.

Once the cyclotron has arrived at the proton center, the Provision team, which includes personnel from ProNova Solutions, Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd., Barnhart Crane & Rigging Co., will then begin the rigging and installation of the cyclotron into the new proton therapy center building. Following installation of the cyclotron, installation, testing and commissioning of the ProNova SC360 will continue as the proton therapy center building is completed.

The cyclotron accelerates a proton beam that is incorporated into the ProNova SC360 delivery system and then used to deliver this advanced cancer treatment. This treatment provides a means to treat the cancer and spare the patient with fewer side effects.

The Provision CARES Proton Center is located in the 17-acre Provision CARES Cancer Center in Hamlin and is a member of the Provision CARES Cancer Network. Provision CARES Cancer Centers with Proton Therapy are also located in Knoxville, TN, Nashville, TN and recently announced Kansas City, KS, where all Provision centers provide comprehensive and integrated diagnostic and therapy services for all patients and all physicians who need those services.

Provision’s leadership team, cancer center partners, and media will be viewing the cyclotron delivery from the construction site at 15775 New Independence Parkway, Winter Garden, Florida.

ABOUT PROTON THERAPY

Proton therapy is an advanced form of radiation therapy that uses a single beam of high-energy protons to treat various forms of cancer. Proton therapy treats tumors by directing protons into the tumor site destroying cancerous cells. Unlike with other forms of radiation, radiation oncologists can control both the dose and range of protons, which allows the maximum deposition of energy into the tumor. This reduces damage to nearby healthy tissue and limits negative side effects. Proton treatment can be combined with chemotherapy and biological treatments, depending on the cancer type, to provide better outcomes with less tissue damage. According to the National Association of Proton Therapy, there are currently 35 proton therapy centers in operation.

ABOUT PROVISION’S PRONOVA SYSTEM

An affiliate of Provision Healthcare, ProNova Solutions, LLC is committed to making proton therapy accessible to a greater number of patients and physicians worldwide. ProNova was founded by former leaders of CTI Molecular Imaging, which brought positron emission tomography (PET) technology out of the laboratory and made it a clinical reality for millions of cancer patients. Today the same team is redefining cancer treatment once again with the introduction of the first and only superconducting 360-degree compact proton therapy system. It is the only proton therapy system developed in a clinical setting, benefitting from continuous input from physicians, medical physicists, and therapists during design and development. The system includes state-of-the-art features such as pencil beam scanning and advanced imaging with cone-beam CT, all in a compact design.

ABOUT PROVISION HEALTHCARE

Provision Healthcare, LLC was formed in 2005 with the purpose of developing innovative healthcare solutions focused on improving patient care and clinical outcomes and developing support for research, educational and charitable causes. Provision has developed a unique, comprehensive expertise in proton therapy including Provision’s patient focused “Culture of Care” that distinguishes Provision from other proton and cancer center developers and operators that have a much narrower focus. The combination of unique expertise and an innovative, entrepreneurial approach continues to propel Provision towards a position of industry leadership with respect to both cancer care and proton therapy.

Innovative Cancer Treatment in Knoxville, TN

Celebrating the Four-Year Anniversary of the Most Innovative Cancer Treatment in the World and Available in Knoxville, Tennessee!

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Many online blogs tell us the traditional 4th anniversary gift is flowers or fruit, but at Provision CARES Proton Therapy, we prefer cake! January 20th marks the 4th anniversary of operation for Provision CARES Proton Therapy Knoxville (PCPTK) providing the most innovative cancer treatment in the world, proton therapy.

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It’s like NASA landed in Franklin: Proton-therapy center nears completion

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After nearly two years of construction, Provision CARES Proton Therapy Nashville is nearing completion of its $100 million cancer-treatment center — minus some areas of the roof.

That’s because crews still need to lower a 28-foot-diameter gantry — a structure about the size of an above-ground pool that rotates around a patient during therapy, allowing treatment from different angles —into place at the 45,000-square-foot facility.

PHOTO BY JOEL STINNETT

It will be the second center for Knoxville-based Provision CARES, which provides proton-radiation treatment for cancer patients. The Franklin campus will also include a 72,000-square-foot medical office building at the cost of $18 million. Both buildings are being funded by tax-exempt bonds issued by the Williamson County Industrial Development Board and are expected to be completed in the summer of 2018.

The gantry, however, is relatively light lifting over at the 11-acre site. In July, a 220-ton particle accelerator, almost the same weight as the Statue of Liberty, was delivered to the facility. Rod Manning, service and maintenance manager at Provision CARES subsidiary ProNova Solutions, said the massive piece of equipment, called a cyclotron, was lowered into place by a 440-ton crane, the largest in Tennessee.

“It’s like NASA landed in Franklin,” Manning said.

Proton therapy delivers a high dose of radiation through a beam and, according to Provision CARES Director of Medical Physics Marc Blakey, has fewer side effects than traditional X-ray radiation.

Blakey said he can plot exactly where cancer is in the body and attack it while sparing surrounding tissue.

“The beam enters and only goes as deep as the tumor. It doesn’t exit the body,” Blakey said. “This allows for a higher dose because we can avoid critical structures.”

The cyclotron acts as the engine in the process, producing beams of protons into one of three gantries enclosed with two-meter thick doors made of lead-reinforced concrete. Most treatments only last a few minutes; Blakey said the center could facilitate up to 90 patients a day.

The two-story building will also house work areas for Gilda’s Club of Tennessee and Scott Hamilton CARES Foundation. Hamilton is on the board at Provision CARES and will have an office at the center.

Tara Mullaney, vice president at Provision CARES, said the inside of the building is designed to feel like a hotel more than a medical facility. Each dressing room will be outfitted with TVs and will have their own themes. The waiting room will a kids play area and a large bell to be rung every time a patient completes the entirety of their treatment.

“Cancer patients are going through enough so we want to make them as comfortable as possible,” Mullaney said. “They are coming here every day so they get to know the staff and feel welcomed.”

Mullaney said that while proton treatment isn’t new — the first center opened in the 1990s — it’s still not widely known. She said that’s because the initial investment for equipment is so high and not all insurance plans cover the therapy, where treatment costs about $2,000 per visit.

The word, however, is spreading, Mullaney said. The Franklin facility will be the 26th proton-treatment center in the nation, up from 13 five years ago, and Provision CARES has plans to build three more centers, she said. Those will be in Orlando, New Orleans and China.

Mullaney said ProNova, a Provision subsidiary, is also designing ways to decrease the size of equipment, therefore making it less expensive to access proton treatment.

“We are always thinking of ways to get better,” Mullaney said. “Franklin costs considerably less than the center in Knoxville because of the reduction in size of equipment and smaller footprint.”

“It’s like NASA landed in Franklin:’ Proton-therapy center nears completion.” Joel Stinnett, Nashville Business Journal

cyclotron, Provision Healthcare, Franklin

Provision installs cyclotron at Nashville site

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Provision Healthcare in expanding cancer centers and advancing proton therapy to Nashville, TN, with the development of the Provision CARES Cancer Center.

After months of excavating and building construction, The Provision CARES Cancer Center in Franklin, Tenn., welcomed the cyclotron, a key component—and the largest—to the new facility. This brings the center one step closer to treating cancer patients in May 2018. (more…)

Big news for Provision—and cancer patients!

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Just four years after launching its research and development process, Provision Healthcare’s ProNova Solutions division has received FDA 510(k) clearance for its SC360 proton therapy system. This is the first and only compact 360 degree pencil beam scanning proton therapy system capable of treating patients at all angles without moving the patient, enabling the most efficient clinical workflows, improved accuracy of treatment, and patient comfort.

The first ProNova system is expected to be used for patient treatment at the Provision CARES Proton Therapy Center in Knoxville, Tennessee next year. (more…)

Provision grows proton therapy in China

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China is excited about proton therapy and for good reason.

Officially, 3.5 million Chinese per year are diagnosed with cancer. And 2.2 million people die of cancer, according to the World Health Organization. In the U.S., 70 percent of those with cancer survive five years after treatment. In China, just 30 percent survive to their five-year anniversary. Treatment is hard to come by—there is less than one conventional radiation therapy machine per million people in China compared to more than 12 machines per million in the U.S., for example. And in China diagnosis often happens too late. (more…)

Provision’s 500th patient takes up insurance cause

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For any cancer patient, the automatic question to a diagnosis is: Why me?

Lou Lovingood may not have the answer, but she’s determined to make the most of an opportunity, which is how she’s come to view her experience with breast cancer.

She is the 500th patient to graduate from treatment at the Provision Center for Proton Therapy.

The announcement was greeted Thursday with balloons, a gaggle of Lovingood’s family and friends, local media coverage and Provision employees dressed in pink.

“Six months ago, I had no idea there was another graduation in my future,” Lovingood told the gathering. “This was not my plan, not my idea and certainly not my choice, but in the midst of the storm we have certainly felt God’s presence and are grateful.”

Lovingood was diagnosed in February with bilateral breast cancer at the Knoxville Comprehensive Breast Center where a mammogram found a 2 millimeter lump in her left breast and a subsequent needle biopsy discovered another 6 millimeter lump in her right breast. She had a lumpectomy in March and was advised by her surgeon to consider proton therapy because of the exposure conventional radiation would give to her heart and lungs. Studies have shown that women successfully treated for breast cancer with conventional radiation therapy are at significantly higher risk for heart disease and secondary lung cancer years.

When she walked into the Provision Center for Proton Therapy for her initial consultation, “I was scared,” she said.

It was hospitality coordinator Sharon Bishop, herself a breast cancer survivor, who reassured her.

“She looked at me and said, “You’re going to be okay,” Lovingood said. “My husband says she’s director of first impressions. She really touched my heart.”

Bishop, who herself has suffered heart damage from conventional radiation treatment, also was the one who convinced Lovingood to treat her cancer with protons.

“She said, ‘I would have paid any amount of money if I had had the option of proton therapy,’” Lovingood said.

For the Lovingoods, it was a big choice to make. Lou’s insurance provider, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Tennessee has denied coverage of the treatment—twice. Provision physician, Dr. Tamara Vern-Gross, is appealing a third time. In the meantime, the family decided to commit to paying for the treatment themselves if necessary. Lovingood is the first Provision patient to receive proton therapy for bilateral breast cancer.

“We made a family decision that was what we were going to do no matter what,” she said.

Lou Lovingood stands in front of Provision's graduation bell with family and friends.
Lou Lovingood stands in front of Provision’s graduation bell with family and friends.

Provision Healthcare opened the proton therapy center in January, 2014, and since then has offered treatment to patients suffering from a variety of cancers including head and neck, lung, esophageal, prostate, brain, bladder, sarcoma, tongue, lymph and colon as well as pediatric cancers. The center, which has three treatment rooms, currently serves about 80 patients per month. Patients travel to Provision from across the country and around the world, including England, the Netherlands, Taiwan, Mexico and Brazil.

Lovingood’s experience with the insurance company, and her conviction about the benefits of proton therapy, have led her to see the opportunity in her breast cancer battle—urging insurance coverage of proton therapy.

“It makes me absolutely furious. It’s wrong for insurance companies not to provide the best possible care,” she said. “What I have learned is proton therapy is better, and it’s worth paying for.”

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WBIR Chief Meterologist Todd Howell pays a surprise visit to 500th patient, Lou Lovingood.

Provision’s 400th patient not just a number

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James Fulghum’s completion of prostate cancer treatment today was a celebration not only for him but for Provision Center for Proton Therapy as well—the graduation of its 400th patient.

A surprised grin crossed Fulghum’s face as he was presented him with a special certificate before he rang the graduation bell.

The event marks a “huge milestone” for Provision. The center opened last January and celebrated its 100th patient graduation just eight months ago. Since then, Provision Center for Proton Therapy has opened a third treatment room and seen its patient numbers increase significantly in 2015.

Fulghum, who came for treatment for aggressive prostate cancer from his home in Lebanon, Tenn., learned of proton therapy through his nephew. Founder and principal at civil engineering firm, Fulghum, MacIndoe & Associates, Billy Fulghum worked with Provision in its early days as the company made site design plans for the new treatment facility.

When his uncle was diagnosed with cancer, Billy Fulghum approached him about considering proton therapy as a treatment option.

“The first thing he said was, ‘I’m not going to the Bahamas to do some experimental thing,’” Billy Fulghum said.

But after perusing the Provision website and meeting with Dr. Marcio Fagundes and staff at Provision, James Fulghum was sold.

“(Dr. Fagundes has) been in this business for many years. He’s seen a lot of things,” Fulghum said. “He laid it out in simple terms that I could understand.”

At the end of eight weeks in Knoxville golfing, visiting the mountains, making friends with other patients—two of whom attended his graduation—and experiencing the hospitality and warmth of the Provision employees—from radiation therapists to hospitality coordinators to financial services manager Rhonda Turner—James Fulghum said he’s sad to go.

“I feel like when I walked through the front door this was heaven and these people were angels,” he said. “Even though I’m number 400, I’m not a number in this place.”