Summer Camp Round Up for Kids (& Kids at Heart)

By

Content and information provided by Marriah Mabe, LCSW at Provision CARES Proton Therapy.

For many kids (and kids at heart), summer camps are one of the best parts of summer and are often a normal part of childhood.  As most families who have experienced cancer can attest, normalcy during cancer treatment is extremely important. However, when a cancer diagnosis affects a child or parent in the family, summer camp might not be an option due to a child’s medical needs or the lack of extra finances to pay for traditional summer camps. Fortunately, there are many camps specifically designed for children with cancer, siblings, or even the whole family. The camp experience can provide positive benefits that will last long after summer ends. Camp attendance may help lessen feelings of anxiety, depression, or loneliness and increase self-esteem, body positivity or coping abilities.

Camps and retreats such as the resources listed here are specially curated to provide a fun week of activities away from the hospital and appointments, while allowing those in attendance to meet other patients, survivors, or family members, and learn that they are not alone. Camps will often have full time care for campers, with most of the overnight camps offering on-site medical facilities staffed with oncology providers who can administer chemo or other medical care if necessary. However, if you are on active treatment for cancer, you will need to discuss your desire to attend a camp or retreat with your oncologist. (more…)

03-22-CauliflowerStirFry

Fighting Cancer with Your Fork Recipe of the Month: Cauliflower Rice with Vegetable Stir-Fry

By

Content and information provided by Casey Coffey MS, RD, LDN Registered Dietician for Provision CARES Proton Therapy Knoxville

Yield:  4 servings

Ingredients:

  • 1 package riced cauliflower (you can find this at Trader Joe’s or Kroger in the produce section)
  • 2 carrots, chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, thinly sliced
  • 1 medium red bell pepper, cored, seeded and chopped
  • 1 vidalia onion, chopped or thinly sliced
  • ¼ teaspoon black pepper
  • 2 cups snow peas, trimmed
  • ½ teaspoon sea salt, divided
  • 2 Tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 1 Tablespoon soy sauce (or Bragg liquid aminos)

Instructions:

  1. Heat olive oil in pan and sauté carrots, stirring occasionally, until softened, about 1 minute.
  2. Add bell pepper and onion, ¼ teaspoon salt, and garlic; cook, stirring frequently, about 2 minutes.
  3. Add peas, sprinkle with remaining ¼ teaspoon salt and pepper and cook, stirring frequently, 1 minute.
  4. Place cooked vegetables in bowl and set aside while preparing cauliflower.
  5. Return skillet to head; add sesame oil, cauliflower and beaten eggs.
  6. Cook, stirring constantly, until eggs are evenly cooked and cauliflower has softened, about 2-4 minutes.
  7. Add cooked vegetables and soy sauce to cauliflower / egg mixture; cook 1 minute more or until warm through.
  8. Divide stir-fry among 4 bowls.
  9. Enjoy!!

Note: Stir fry chicken, shrimp or tofu with above to complete your meal.

9 Tips to Prevent Cancer

9 Tips to Reduce Your Risk of Cancer

By

“If we could give every individual the right amount of nourishment and exercise, not too little and not too much, we would have found the safest way to health.” – Hippocrates

February is National Cancer Prevention Month and Provision CARES Proton Therapy is dedicated to providing educational awareness on cancer prevention and early detection. Along with regular screenings and physician check-ups, maintaining a healthy lifestyle is one of the main ways to reduce your risk of cancer. There is no single food or food substance that can fully prevent or cure cancer.  However, there are a number of lifestyle adjustments you can do on your own to reduce the risk of cancer. A number of foods are rich in nutrients and provide long-term benefits to the body. Adopting a healthy lifestyle that promotes a healthy weight, a balanced plant-based diet, and movement on a regular basis is proven to reduce your risk for some cancers(more…)

Mediterranean Diet to Reduce Lung Cancer

Reduce the risk of lung cancer with Mediterranean diet

By

Replacing saturated fat with polyunsaturated fat impacts reduce risk of lung cancer

By Casey Coffey MS, RD, LDN

According to recent studies, benefits of polyunsaturated fats have been widely reviewed by looking at the relationship between dietary components of the Mediterranean diet and cancer risk, diabetes, cardiovascular events, and Alzheimer’s disease. Within these studies, the primary conclusion shows correlation between fat intake and risk associated with lung cancer.

(more…)

Renewal required for healthy body and mind

By

So far in The Wheel of Life blog we have talked about Fitness and Nutrition. Today we are going to address Restoration. How do you restore your energy, vitality and health? The definition of restoration is “the action of returning something to a former owner, place, or condition.” Number one there is an action; it doesn’t happen without exerting effort. Secondly, something is being returned to a former condition. (more…)

Cancer diagnosis? Don’t skip exercise

By

Starting an exercise program after a cancer diagnosis can be very beneficial and result in patients emerging from treatment stronger mentally and physically!

This has been proven by research. One study out of the University of Alberta, led by Kerry Courneya demonstrated increased stamina, increased functional capacity, more strength, improved self-esteem, improved treatment tolerance, decreased pain and an overall better quality of life! Psychological improvements included a decrease in mood disturbances and depression and fewer sleep problems.

The specific exercise “dose” varies from patient to patient depending on if they were exercisers prior to diagnosis and their general physical abilities. The specific cancer diagnosis, treatment regimen, cancer type and how they are responding to treatment also have a part of play. Lymphedema, swelling that can happen as a side effect of breast cancer surgery, can also affect exercise choices but can have significant benefits as well. One size does not fit all! It is important to consult with a Cancer Exercise Specialist and, if necessary, a Lymphedema Specialist to help get started with a program that is right for you.

Following cancer surgery, exercise plays a vital role in helping one return to the fitness level and strength that was maintained prior to surgery. In some cases, surgery, compounded by reconstruction and radiation, has impacts on posture that can be drastically improved through a combination of stretching and strengthening muscles. These can affect everyday functioning like cooking, reaching for things in your cabinet, sitting at a desk, or holding a baby. These muscle imbalances can create a chain reaction leading to neck, back, knee or ankle pain. A thorough assessment can help determine what areas need to be stretched and what muscles need to be strengthened.

It’s also important not to forget the improvements made through cardiovascular conditioning. Exercises like biking, walking, swimming, running, etc. show an increase in endorphins that will give patients a boost emotionally as well as much-needed energy. Not only can a combination of stretching and strengthening improve a cancer survivor’s quality of life during and after treatment, there is a lower rate of recurrence when patients are involved in an ongoing exercise program after treatment is complete. [i]

 

[i] Leonard, Andrea BA, C.S.C.S., C.P.T., CES with Dr. Gero, Genn B., Cancer Exercise Specialist Handbook, (Cancer Exercise Training Institute, 2013)

Cancer patient finds help post-treatment

By

Staying healthy after cancer treatment is an important part of long-term survival and crucial in helping patients resume normal lives.

Sometimes, patients want to learn how to make healthy life changes following the restrictions on exercise and diet during cancer treatment. Sometimes they’re grappling with the results of treatment on their bodies.

Like Toni Doody.

A breast cancer survivor, she sought physical therapy from Kathy Kearse with Provision Physical Therapy  when suffering from lymphedema after her bilateral mastectomy. After receiving treatment there for several months, she learned about a new class Kearse and cancer exercise specialist Kathleen Bullock Provision Health and Performance,  were launching, designed specifically for the needs of cancer survivors.

“I thought it would be a good fit, and it was,” says Doody. “I just wanted to be able to do the exercise that would help my body and improve flexibility.”

After attending the first round of classes last year, Doody signed up for the second set of classes in January. The bi-weekly classes each feature an exercise session and an educational seminar on a variety of topics ranging from the risk of lymphedema, hydration, nutrition, foam rolling, relaxation and restoration.

“I really like Kathleen. She’s very positive and motivating,” says Doody. :It’s always easier to do it with someone else.”

In addition to educational sessions, the program consists of stretching, strengthening, and cardiovascular conditioning exercises targeted at the needs of men and women following recovery from cancer treatments who are ready to take the next step toward better health.

A new “Small Group Training for Cancer Survivors” will be held April 19-May 12, from 8:15-9:15 a.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays. More times will be made available as needed.

The class is open to both men and women who have completed treatment for cancer. A medical release from an oncologist or primary care physician is preferred in order to ensure participants are ready for exercise.

Groups will consist of 4-8 participants. Cost is $160 for eight sessions. For more information or to sign up, call 865-232-1414.