Male cancer patient using telehealth

Telehealth can help cancer patients during coronavirus pandemic

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Trying to navigate your cancer care journey is challenging enough without the added stress of a global pandemic.  Normally, you would schedule an in-person consultation with a physician to discuss your treatment options. Understandably though, many cancer patients now have reservations about going out in public during the coronavirus pandemic. Thankfully, telehealth provides a safe way for someone with cancer to continue moving forward with their care in a timely manner.

Provision CARES Proton Therapy implemented an expanded telehealth program in March 2020. This has allowed us to continue helping cancer patients in a safe environment, while also limiting the number of people at our centers. Since March, our physicians have conducted many telehealth consultations and virtual follow-up appointments. Our telehealth program allows someone who has been recently diagnosed with cancer to remain at home and speak directly to a physician through a video connection about their diagnosis, treatment options and next steps.  Our Cancer Care Experts can help patients through this process.

CANCER CARE PROVIDERS TURN TO TECHNOLOGY

The coronavirus pandemic has changed many aspects of the healthcare industry. When the outbreak began to gain momentum in the United States, hospitals made operational changes to accommodate a potential influx of COVID-19 patients. Many general practitioners and specialists began to postpone well-visits and elective procedures. Specialty healthcare providers, including cancer treatment centers, also made adjustments to keep their patients, employees and visitors safe. Many of those providers, including Provision CARES Proton Therapy, turned to technology, broadening their ability to provide cancer care through the use of telehealth.

A recent survey indicated nearly half of all physicians are now communicating with patients through telemedicine, a stark rise from just two years ago. The survey, conducted by Merritt Hawkins, a physician search firm, in collaboration with The Physicians Foundation, sought to learn how COVID-19 is impacting physicians and how they are responding. It found that 48 percent of physicians are using telemedicine with patients. A similar study by The Physicians Foundation in 2018 had that number at just 18 percent.

The increase in telehealth usage was aided further after the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services announced they would broaden access to Medicare telehealth services as part of the federal government’s emergency pandemic response.

CANCER & TELEHEALTH FROM A PHYSICIAN’S PERSPECTIVE

James Gray, MD, FACRO, Medical Director at Provision CARES Proton Therapy NashvilleSince the use of telehealth for medical appointments is becoming more common, we’re providing some firsthand insight into how it works and why it’s such a valuable tool for cancer patients. We asked the medical director of Provision CARES Proton Therapy Nashville, Dr. James Gray, a few questions about his experience with telehealth during the pandemic. Dr. Gray is a board-certified radiation oncologist who has spent 30 years studying cancer and helping patients navigate their cancer care journey.

What are your general thoughts on the use of telehealth for cancer care?

“I believe telehealth substantially contributes to our ability to communicate with patients.  While this applies across all areas of healthcare, it particularly applies to services which are restricted or to which there is limited access.  Proton therapy is a prime example of this.  I can interact with and advise patients who might not otherwise find it reasonable or even possible to travel to our center, or any other proton center.  Such patients may find that proton therapy has possible benefits for their circumstance and might make the trip worthwhile.”

What kind of feedback have you heard from cancer patients who’ve used telehealth?

“Generally good.  Telehealth allows us to help prevent a delay in the cancer patient’s process. As long as an in-person assessment is not necessary, then a telehealth consult allows me to counsel a patient quite well based on medical records and images forwarded to us in advance.  If equally feasible, an in-person visit is still superior for this communication, but a telehealth visit allows me to get the message across and answer the patient’s questions.”

What would you tell a patient who’s nervous about trying a telehealth appointment?

“I reassure the patient and family members that the telehealth visit can start the process of managing their cancer, but more interactions will follow in order to answer subsequent questions and direct further workup of their disease.  If the reason the patient feels nervous or uncomfortable is simply a technology concern, we can have our administrative staff reach out to them and their family to provide assistance.”

As a doctor, how has telehealth helped you during the coronavirus pandemic?

“It allows me to interact with more patients, and in a more timely manner, than I otherwise could due to visitation restrictions, or perhaps just logistics of travel for the patient.  I receive gratification from counseling patients through a rough time, always hoping to alleviate concerns and fears about issues they don’t understand and taking away some of the uncertainty of their next steps.”

Are there other ways cancer care providers are taking advantage of technology during the pandemic?

“Besides avoiding unnecessary contact between care providers and patients, physicians have suspended our in-person meetings called tumor boards or tumor conferences.  But there is a silver lining to this change because we have been forced to become better at virtual meetings, allowing us to exchange ideas and recommendations through audio/visual software.  Again, in-person meetings will likely always be preferable when reasonable, but the ability to attend the meeting virtually from your office or home has been given a big boost during this time.  Ultimately, comfort with this type of meeting attendance makes the meeting more accessible.  And the more we interact, the better we explore all options for our patients.”


To learn more about Dr. Gray and the other board-certified radiation oncologists at Provision CARES Proton Therapy, please visit Our Physicians page. If you are interested in learning more about proton therapy or scheduling a telehealth consultation, please call the Treatment Location closest to you and speak with one of our Cancer Care Experts.

Provision doctor diagnosed with cancer, chooses proton therapy for his own treatment

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This story starts the way a lot of cancer stories start. A visit to the doctor for an unrelated issue. A few tests. And then, while trying to solve one problem, the doctor discovers another – a red flag.

That discovery sparks a journey down a road far too many have traveled. First, more trips to the doctor. Then more tests. And then the waiting. Waiting with fear and uncertainty – hoping for the best, but preparing for the worst. Until eventually, the wait is over and the news is in…

It’s cancer.

And from there, this story continues down a common path. Mulling over questions like “How bad is it?” and “How do I deal with this?” Determining the options and choosing a treatment. And of course, fighting the cancer.

There’s something uncommon about this story, though – the person making the journey. Because he’s literally been down this road hundreds of times before. He knows the roadmap better than most, because he’s guided people through it for decades.

The only difference this time? He’s no longer the guide. This is his journey.

FROM DOCTOR TO PATIENT

James Gray, MD, FACRO, Medical Director at Provision CARES Proton Therapy NashvilleDr. James Gray is a board-certified Radiation Oncologist and the Medical Director at Provision CARES Proton Therapy Nashville. His career includes work with the National Naval Medical Center and the National Cancer Institute. He began practicing radiation oncology in Nashville in the mid-1990s, including membership in Tennessee Oncology, one of the largest privately-held physician groups in the country. He has established his reputation as a pioneer in the industry, performing many advanced procedures never-before-seen in the region.

Accomplishments and accolades, aside, it’s Dr. Gray’s passion and commitment to his patients that define him. He’s spent 30 years studying cancer and helping patients navigate the difficult path of fighting it.

“I get to work with patients in a time of dire need for them. They undergo a diagnosis of cancer, and this is terribly frightening for most people to accept and move forward,” says Dr. Gray. “Helping someone move through that. Counseling them. Making them understand their disease. That’s what brings joy to me – the actual effort of bringing this understanding to those patients and then bringing the best possible care to them. That drives me every day.”

Then, in 2019, he visited a physician to check out a minor health issue. During that visit, Dr. Gray underwent a PSA level screening. Much to his surprise, the levels came back slightly elevated – a possible indication of prostate cancer.

“I realized with that PSA level, I needed to pursue this, and I went to see another physician – an outstanding urologist – and he proceeded with a diagnostic work up. That led to some other lab tests, an examination and then a biopsy.”

Dr. Gray recalled the anxiety he felt during the days following the biopsy. “You’ve got to wait maybe 3 or 4 days to get the pathology results back. I got to live firsthand that trepidation – that worry of, ‘Oh gosh. I hope it’s not cancer.’”

Unfortunately, though, it was cancer. Prostate cancer.

“It put me in a unique position where I’ve actually counseled patients who’ve just gotten this news. I’ve counseled probably more patients in this setting than anybody else in the area. All of a sudden, I’m counseling myself. Now, I’m the patient.”

WEIGHING THE OPTIONS

After receiving the news of his cancer diagnosis, Dr. Gray says he had a 30-year head start on the typical patient. As an established Nashville oncologist, he already had a strong grasp on the answers to questions like, “What does this mean for my life?” and “Am I going to die from this?” However, it was still important for him to remain objective, gather information about the severity of his cancer, then step back and make a clear treatment decision.

The initial decision for most prostate cancer patients is to determine whether the cancer is actually worthy of treatment, or if it would be more appropriate to observe it through active surveillance. In Dr. Gray’s case, he felt the cancer was threatening enough to treat immediately.

The next big divide – the “fork in the road,” as Dr. Gray calls it – is to decide whether to remove the prostate surgically or treat the tumor with radiation therapy.

“For me, that was not a difficult decision,” he says. “Knowing what I know about the likelihood of getting rid of the disease and the likelihood of having any kind of consequences from the treatment itself, I knew pretty quickly that I wanted to have radiation.”

That led to his next decision – choosing a radiation therapy method. There are many options for prostate cancer patients, including traditional x-ray radiation, radioactive seed implants (brachytherapy) and proton therapy.

For Dr. Gray, this was another easy decision. “One of the key advantages of proton therapy is that we’re putting (radiation) into the tumor with as little unnecessary dose to other tissues as possible. That inherently reduces the possibility of side effects – fatigue, difficulty with urination or bowels in my circumstance. So statistically, I am convinced. I’ve seen the data. I know what I consider to be the best treatment for prostate cancer, in my particular setting, was a proton therapy treatment system.”

“And fortunately, I happen to work at a proton system.”

WORK-LIFE BALANCE

They say it’s important to have a good work-life balance in your career. In Dr. Gray’s case, those two worlds collided as soon as the radiation oncologist began his proton therapy treatment in Nashville.

“I could actually go to work every day and receive a treatment – close to six weeks of treatment – but I was just going to work. And for 20 or 30 minutes, I stepped into the patient role, had my treatment, then went back into the doctor role.”

Dr. Gray remembers the transition from doctor to patient being fairly easy, mainly because of the trust he had in the treatment itself, as well as the Provision CARES team performing the treatment.

“For a lot of patients, they have to slowly gain the trust in me as their physician. They have to gain the trust in the people that are going to do their treatment. They have to gain the trust in the technology,” notes Dr. Gray. “I didn’t have those misgivings. I knew that when I was being treated, very bright people were watching over the treatment and making sure it was done right. I know how competent, outstanding and professional those people are, so I didn’t have any qualms about that.”

In fact, Dr. Gray’s positive attitude during his treatment actually helped the other staff members deal with a situation in which their colleague, friend and mentor was battling cancer – and they happened to be the ones treating it.

“I’ve never been in that situation before where you’re treating someone that you know so closely,” remembers Justin Pigg, Radiation Therapy Manager at Provision Nashville. “But to Dr. Gray, he just wanted to be treated like any other patient. He wanted the patient experience.”

“He was really calm and really strong through it, and I think that helped everybody else be calm, as well,” says Valerie Bohannon, the proton center’s Patient Concierge.

That sense of calm among the team was critical, as just about everyone at Provision Nashville had some role in Dr. Gray’s treatment.

“It’s all the way from the top to the bottom,” Dr. Gray says. “Every member of this staff had something to do with making sure my treatment went well. They all wished me well. They all asked me how I was doing. They were genuinely concerned about this.”

And that concern – that culture of care – is what Provision is all about. Dr. Gray hears it from his patients all the time.

“They will tell me how impressed they are from the moment they walk in the door to the time they’re leaving the center. They felt like they’ve been enveloped in care. And I felt the exact same way. It was obvious to me that I was brought into that care – that love – that people wanted me to do well.”

WALKING IN THE PATIENT’S SHOES

Dr. Gray, a Nashville oncologist, completing his proton therapy treatment at Provision CARES NashvilleDr. Gray successfully completed proton therapy in January 2020, placing him in a rare category of radiation oncologists who’ve actually been through the very cancer treatment in which they specialize. He says the entire experience impacted the way he’ll approach his role as a doctor going forward.

“It was enlightening. Going through the treatment myself gave me quite a bit of a different perspective. It’s important for me to understand that my personal experience can be translated only some degree to my patients, but at least having a taste of it allowed me to understand a bit more how they see it – how they experience the whole treatment process.”

That “taste” of proton therapy, as he calls it, will now be another tool for a Nashville oncologist who is passionate about making this effective and successful treatment available to as many people as possible.

“Some people suggested I had to choose proton therapy because I work at a proton therapy center. No, not necessarily. I’m not going to compromise my own good health just to make a point in my professional career. I wanted to have the best outcome, and I genuinely believe my best outcome would be achieved through the use of proton therapy.”

And with 36 operating proton centers across the country, why did he choose to be treated at Provision CARES Proton Therapy Nashville? He says that was another easy decision.

“Why would I leave here when I know I’ve got great people here to treat me. I can get world class treatment by world class people just downstairs from my office. Why wouldn’t I take advantage of that?”

Provision CARES Proton Therapy Orlando announces arrival of cyclotron in Hamlin development

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WINTER GARDEN, Fla. — Provision CARES Proton Therapy Orlando is under construction in the Hamlin development in Southwest Orange County. The center will offer one of the most promising new cancer therapies available, proton therapy; and will utilize the latest advancement in proton therapy systems, the ProNova SC360 manufactured by ProNova Solutions, LLC located in Maryville, Tennessee.

On Wednesday, November 20, one of the key components of the proton therapy system, the cyclotron, will travel from Cape Canaveral to Hamlin on a flatbed truck along a FDOT pre-approved route. The cyclotron travel time is expected to take approximately four hours before arrival at Hamlin. The cyclotron generates the proton beam that is used to treat patients through the ProNova SC360 system. Delivery of the cyclotron is a milestone event in the construction of the proton therapy treatment center.

Once the cyclotron has arrived at the proton center, the Provision team, which includes personnel from ProNova Solutions, Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd., Barnhart Crane & Rigging Co., will then begin the rigging and installation of the cyclotron into the new proton therapy center building. Following installation of the cyclotron, installation, testing and commissioning of the ProNova SC360 will continue as the proton therapy center building is completed.

The cyclotron accelerates a proton beam that is incorporated into the ProNova SC360 delivery system and then used to deliver this advanced cancer treatment. This treatment provides a means to treat the cancer and spare the patient with fewer side effects.

The Provision CARES Proton Center is located in the 17-acre Provision CARES Cancer Center in Hamlin and is a member of the Provision CARES Cancer Network. Provision CARES Cancer Centers with Proton Therapy are also located in Knoxville, TN, Nashville, TN and recently announced Kansas City, KS, where all Provision centers provide comprehensive and integrated diagnostic and therapy services for all patients and all physicians who need those services.

Provision’s leadership team, cancer center partners, and media will be viewing the cyclotron delivery from the construction site at 15775 New Independence Parkway, Winter Garden, Florida.

ABOUT PROTON THERAPY

Proton therapy is an advanced form of radiation therapy that uses a single beam of high-energy protons to treat various forms of cancer. Proton therapy treats tumors by directing protons into the tumor site destroying cancerous cells. Unlike with other forms of radiation, radiation oncologists can control both the dose and range of protons, which allows the maximum deposition of energy into the tumor. This reduces damage to nearby healthy tissue and limits negative side effects. Proton treatment can be combined with chemotherapy and biological treatments, depending on the cancer type, to provide better outcomes with less tissue damage. According to the National Association of Proton Therapy, there are currently 35 proton therapy centers in operation.

ABOUT PROVISION’S PRONOVA SYSTEM

An affiliate of Provision Healthcare, ProNova Solutions, LLC is committed to making proton therapy accessible to a greater number of patients and physicians worldwide. ProNova was founded by former leaders of CTI Molecular Imaging, which brought positron emission tomography (PET) technology out of the laboratory and made it a clinical reality for millions of cancer patients. Today the same team is redefining cancer treatment once again with the introduction of the first and only superconducting 360-degree compact proton therapy system. It is the only proton therapy system developed in a clinical setting, benefitting from continuous input from physicians, medical physicists, and therapists during design and development. The system includes state-of-the-art features such as pencil beam scanning and advanced imaging with cone-beam CT, all in a compact design.

ABOUT PROVISION HEALTHCARE

Provision Healthcare, LLC was formed in 2005 with the purpose of developing innovative healthcare solutions focused on improving patient care and clinical outcomes and developing support for research, educational and charitable causes. Provision has developed a unique, comprehensive expertise in proton therapy including Provision’s patient focused “Culture of Care” that distinguishes Provision from other proton and cancer center developers and operators that have a much narrower focus. The combination of unique expertise and an innovative, entrepreneurial approach continues to propel Provision towards a position of industry leadership with respect to both cancer care and proton therapy.

Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Breast Cancer Facts: 5 Common Myths Debunked

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One of the toughest parts about researching breast cancer online is trying to sort fact from fiction. The internet is full of half-truths, conflicting reports and flat-out myths about the disease. Provision CARES Proton Therapy is committed to our Culture of CARE, putting the patient experience first. So, for Breast Cancer Awareness Month, we’re debunking five of our most commonly heard myths. All of these breast cancer facts have been verified for quality and accuracy by our cancer care experts to help you make an informed decision about your healthcare.


MYTH: I found a lump in my breast, so I have cancer.

TRUTH: Lumps don’t always indicate cancer. Likewise, the absence of lumps doesn’t always mean you don’t have breast cancer.

While the most common symptom of breast cancer is a lump, most breast lumps are caused by conditions other than cancer. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the two most common causes are fibrocystic breast condition and cysts. Fibrocystic condition causes noncancerous changes in the breast that can make them lumpy, while cysts are small fluid-filled sacs that develop in the breast.

The American Cancer Society (ACS) says lumps are more likely to be cancerous if they are painless, hard and have irregular edges. However, some breast cancers can be painful, soft or round. That’s why you should always check with your doctor if you notice any changes in your breasts.

There are many other symptoms of breast cancer, even if a lump is not detected. These can include swelling of the breast, skin dimpling, breast or nipple pain, nipples turning inward, red or flaking breast skin, nipples discharging fluids other than breast milk, and swollen lymph nodes under your arm or around your collar bone. The ACS recommends contacting your doctor if you experience any of these symptoms.


MYTH: Breast cancer only happens to older women.

TRUTH: Breast cancer can develop in younger women, too, as well as men.

While your risk does increase with age, the NCI reports women in their 30s have a 1 in 208 chance of developing breast cancer. By the time a woman reaches her 40s, that risk has increased to 1 in 65. Overall, it’s estimated that 1 out of every 8 women in the United States will develop breast cancer at some point in her life.7

Breast cancer in men accounts for less than 1% of cases in the United States. However, the ACS says male breast cancer is on the rise.1 Unfortunately, a higher percentage of men are diagnosed with advanced-stage breast cancer, likely a result of less awareness and fewer early-detection screenings.

If you’ve been diagnosed with breast cancer and would like to learn more about proton therapy as a possible treatment, please visit our Proton Benefits page or contact a Care Coordinator.


MYTH: My family has no history of breast cancer, so I am not at risk.

TRUTH: While a family history of breast cancer does put you at greater risk, most women who develop breast cancer do not have a family history of the disease.1

According to the CDC, a family history of breast cancer may put you at higher risk for the disease, but is not indicative of whether you’ll actually develop cancer.2 In fact, the ACS says most women with one or more affected first-degree relatives (parents, siblings, children) will still never be diagnosed.

The CDC provides a table with examples of average, moderate and strong family health histories, along with suggestions for preventative measures each group can take. Regardless of your family history, the CDC recommends you get mammograms and other breast exams as recommended by your doctor, maintain a healthy weight and exercise regularly. As family history of breast cancer increases, genetic counseling becomes an option to test for hereditary breast cancer. Be sure to talk to your doctor about what screenings are best for you and when you should get them.


MYTH: A double mastectomy will eliminate my risk of breast cancer.

TRUTH: If the cancer is detected early enough, other treatment options can eliminate the cancer without removing the entire breast.

A mastectomy involves removing the entire breast and is typically performed when breast-conserving surgery (lumpectomy) is not an option. However, women with early-stage cancers can typically choose between the two types of surgeries. The ACS notes that while it’s normal for your gut reaction to be to “take out all the cancer as quickly as possible” with a mastectomy, the fact is that, most of the time, a lumpectomy combined with radiation therapy results in the same outcome.

Many patients at Provision CARES Proton Therapy choose to combine a lumpectomy with proton radiation therapy. Proton therapy for breast cancer treatment is non-invasive and painless, causing less cosmetic damage than conventional x-ray radiation. It is extremely precise and therefore more effective at targeting cancerous cells without causing damage to surrounding breast tissue. Because proton radiation has little to no impact on a patient’s energy level, quality of life during treatment is improved.

For women who do opt for a mastectomy, it’s important to remember that post-surgery treatment is still necessary. Even after removing the breast, there’s a small chance the cancer could recur on residual breast tissue or the chest wall. You should continue to perform self-breast exams and see your doctor on a regular basis.


MYTH: Antiperspirants and wire bras can cause breast cancer.

TRUTH: There has been no conclusive evidence linking antiperspirants or bras to breast cancer.

Rumors have swirled across the internet claiming underarm antiperspirants cause breast cancer. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) says the basis of these claims is the aluminum-based active ingredient in antiperspirants. Some scientists have suggested that absorbing these aluminum compounds into your skin could increase your risk factor for breast cancer.4 Still, no clear link has ever been established between antiperspirants and breast cancer. In fact, the NCI even cites a study from 2002 that concluded there is no increase in risk for breast cancer among women who reported using an underarm antiperspirant.3

Another rumor making its rounds across cyberspace is that wearing a wire bra can increase your risk of breast cancer. This myth was debunked by a 2014 study published by the American Association for Cancer Research. According to the authors, it had been suggested in the media that bras impede lymph circulation and drainage, interfering with the process of waste and toxin removal.6 However, the study concluded that wearing a bra had no effect on your risk of breast cancer.


Sources:

  1. Breast Cancer Facts & Figures 2017-2018. American Cancer Society. https://www.cancer.org/content/dam/cancer-org/research/cancer-facts-and-statistics/breast-cancer-facts-and-figures/breast-cancer-facts-and-figures-2017-2018.pdf
  2. Breast and Ovarian Cancer and Family History Risk Categories. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/genomics/disease/breast_ovarian_cancer/risk_categories.htm
  3. National Cancer Institute. Antiperspirants/Deodorants and Breast Cancer. https://www.cancer.org/cancer/cancer-causes/antiperspirants-and-breast-cancer-risk.html
  4. Darbre PD. Aluminium, antiperspirants and breast cancer.Journal of Inorganic Biochemistry 2005; 99(9):1912–1919. [PubMed Abstract]
  5. Mirick DK, Davis S, Thomas DB. Antiperspirant use and the risk of breast cancer.Journal of the National Cancer Institute 2002; 94(20):1578–1580. [PubMed Abstract]
  6. RayCC. Q and A – Bras and Cancer [Internet]. NY times; 2010 [cited 2013 Dec. 16]. Available from: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/16/science/16qna.html?ref=science.
  7. Howlader N, Noone AM, Krapcho M, et al. (eds). SEER Cancer Statistics Review, 1975-2016, National Cancer Institute. Bethesda, MD,https://seer.cancer.gov/csr/1975_2016/, based on November 2018 SEER data submission, posted to the SEER web site, April 2019.

 

Nurses Week 2018

Nurses Week 2018

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Content and information provided by Lindsay Chandler, RN, BSN, OCN Nursing Manager for Provision CARES Proton Therapy Knoxville

May 6-12 is a week of excellence for every nurse, and marks a time to acknowledge accomplishments, compassionate patient care and professionalism for the nursing society. The conclusion of Nurses Week is May 12th, in honor of the mother of nursing, Florence Nightingale. Florence Nightingale was born on May 12th, 1820, and she was the innovator of modern nursing. It was through her teaching, compassion, leadership and influence, that the world of nursing has evolved into what it is today.

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04-12-18_VolunteerAppreciation

Volunteer Appreciation in the “Volunteer State”

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This week, April 15-21, Provision will celebrate Volunteer Appreciation Week by honoring our very own Proton Volunteer, Mrs. Sue. Sue and her husband retired to Knoxville from Washington, DC in 2001. She has been a volunteer for Provision CARES Proton Therapy Knoxville since 2016 and has been filling the proton center with extra joy and smiles ever since. (more…)

support and financial resources

Top Support Resources for Dealing with a Cancer Diagnosis and Your Employer

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Content and information provided by Marriah Mabe, LCSW at Provision CARES Proton Therapy.

Many cancer patients say that one of the most difficult aspects of cancer treatment is loss of income during treatment. Extra costs for medical visits, copays, travel to appointments, medications, and other expenses add up quickly.  However, there are laws meant to protect individuals undergoing medical treatment from losing their job. Additionally, if you have life insurance or other insurance policies through your employer, you may have access to financial resources you are not aware of. Provision CARES Proton Therapy team provides support and resources to help get you started in the process of exploring options that may be available to you as you are undergoing treatment. (more…)

WE CAN. I CAN

World Cancer Day: Provision CARES Proton Therapy Impacts of Cancer Care in East Tennessee

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Provision has treated almost 2,000 patients with proton therapy in Knoxville, Tennessee. These patients traveled from all over the United States and the world to receive the most advanced form of cancer treatment. Proton therapy benefit from reduced side effects and improved quality of life compared to those who receive conventional radiation therapy or surgery.

Sunday, February 4th, is an important day in the eyes of many. Many people will be gathered with friends and family cheering on their favorite NFL team, watching the nation’s most expensive commercials, or snacking on chips and salsa. However, to Provision CARES Proton Therapy, February 4th means a lot more. It is World Cancer Day, a day to raise awareness about cancer and how it affects people and communities across the globe. (more…)

Innovative Cancer Treatment in Knoxville, TN

Celebrating the Four-Year Anniversary of the Most Innovative Cancer Treatment in the World and Available in Knoxville, Tennessee!

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Many online blogs tell us the traditional 4th anniversary gift is flowers or fruit, but at Provision CARES Proton Therapy, we prefer cake! January 20th marks the 4th anniversary of operation for Provision CARES Proton Therapy Knoxville (PCPTK) providing the most innovative cancer treatment in the world, proton therapy.

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