Year in review 2020 at Provision CARES Proton Therapy

Year in Review: 2020 at Provision CARES Proton Therapy

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Writing a “Year in Review” blog feels a little different in 2020. We typically think back fondly on the year that was; remembering the moments that made it so great. For most of us though, “great” might not be the first word that comes to mind when we think of 2020.

A global pandemic gripped the world and brought with it fear, anxiety, uncertainty, and unfortunately, tragedy. While we can’t ignore the reality of 2020, we can still choose to look beyond the surface of it. We can choose to find the positive, the admirable, and the inspirational.

Here are some of the highlights from 2020 at Provision CARES Proton Therapy. As you close out this tumultuous year, perhaps a reminder of the good that still came out of it will help lead you into 2021 with a sense of hope and optimism.

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Study finds PSA test for prostate cancer has long-term benefits

PSA test for prostate cancer offers long-term benefits, study finds

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September is Prostate Cancer Awareness Month and it’s common to hear public service announcements reminding men to get a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test. Afterall, prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death among American men and early detection is the best prevention.

However, recent recommendations from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) cast doubt on whether the potential risks associated with PSA screening are worth the reward. Now though, new research suggests those risks may be exaggerated.

The long-term benefits of the PSA test for prostate cancer may outweigh any potential harm according to a recent paper published in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM). While current guidelines advise patients and physicians to determine the value of routine PSA screening on a case-by-case basis, researchers suggest that perceptions of PSA tests as ineffective are based on overstated harms and point to evidence showing that screenings can reduce death rates and prevent metastatic disease.

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Prostate cancer patients can choose watchful waiting or active surveillance if they wish to forgo immediate treatment

Prostate Cancer: Watchful Waiting vs. Active Surveillance

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About one out of every nine men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer during his lifetime, making it the second most common cancer in American men, behind only skin cancer.1 However, due to advances in cancer screening awareness and early detection, most men will not die from prostate cancer. In fact, many men who are diagnosed with an early-stage, low-grade cancer may need little to no immediate medical treatment. Instead, they can choose from two different methods of monitoring their prostate cancer: watchful waiting or active surveillance.

For men with prostate cancer, the goal of cancer management methods like watchful waiting and active surveillance is to avoid the side effects caused by cancer treatments like surgery or radiation therapy.

Both watchful waiting and active surveillance are ways of monitoring the cancer for changes, but the reasons for choosing one method over the other are different:

  • Watchful waiting is better for men who can’t undergo curative treatment. It is meant to manage symptoms by controlling the cancer, but is not intended to cure it.
  • Active surveillance is better for men who would benefit from curative treatment should the cancer become more aggressive.

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Delaying cancer screening tests during COVID puts patients at risk

Delayed cancer screenings in COVID era put patients at risk

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When the COVID-19 pandemic began, life as we knew it came to an abrupt halt. That included routine healthcare visits, as many providers postponed appointments and cancer screening tests that were deemed “non-essential.”

In the United States alone, an estimated 22 million cancer screening tests were disrupted by COVID-19 from April to June 2020. As a result, about 80,000 patients could be at risk for delayed or missed diagnoses.

The IQVIA Institute for Human Data Science recently published these estimates as part of its report on shifts in healthcare demand, delivery and care during the COVID-19 era. In this article, we’ll look at how diagnostic procedures for some of the most common cancers are impacted. We’ll also share some tips to help you move forward with your cancer-related care in a timely and safe manner.

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Proton therapy cancer treatment significantly lowers the risk of second cancer compared to IMRT and 3DCRT

Proton Therapy significantly lowers risk of second cancer

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X-ray (also called photon) therapy has long been known to cause the development of potentially deadly new cancers in patients who undergo radiation therapy to treat their cancer. However, research shows that patients who choose proton therapy for cancer treatment have a significantly lower risk of developing a second cancer later in life.

In a  comprehensive study published last month in Cancer, the prestigious, peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, researchers at Stanford University found that patients who were treated with x-ray therapy developed more than three times as many new cancers as patients treated with proton therapy.1

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Provision doctor diagnosed with cancer, chooses proton therapy for his own treatment

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This story starts the way a lot of cancer stories start. A visit to the doctor for an unrelated issue. A few tests. And then, while trying to solve one problem, the doctor discovers another – a red flag.

That discovery sparks a journey down a road far too many have traveled. First, more trips to the doctor. Then more tests. And then the waiting. Waiting with fear and uncertainty – hoping for the best, but preparing for the worst. Until eventually, the wait is over and the news is in…

It’s cancer.

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Upcoming Event: Prostate Cancer 101: Understanding the Journey Diagnosis, Treatment, and Survival

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Join us for a free presentation to learn more about the latest developments in prostate cancer. Dr. Wilkinson will discuss the most advanced diagnostic tools and current trends in treatment including multiparametric MRI, genomic classification, when to use active surveillance, and how to preserve quality of life after a prostate diagnosis.

Friday, September 20th from  930-11a

Hosted by: Provision CARES Proton Therapy Knoxville, 6450 Provision CARES Way, Knoxville, TN 37909

RSVP: To reserve your seat, please RSVP to Jenni Turner at 865.321.4539 or jenni.turner@provisionhp.com

Free PSA level screenings offered throughout East Tennessee

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Eddie Check® and the Provision CARES Foundation Team Up for Blood Drive and Free PSA Screenings

Available at 16 different East Tennessee locations across 10 counties on September 12th & 13th.

Unbelievably, One in nine men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer during his lifetime – and one in 41 will die from it. Prostate cancer is second only to skin cancer as the most common cancer in American men and second only to lung cancer as the leading cancer-based cause of death in American men. The American Cancer Society estimates that in the U.S. during 2019, about 174,650 new cases of prostate cancer will be diagnosed and 31,620 men will die from it.

But there’s still good news. If prostate cancer is caught early, the 5-year survival rate is nearly 100%. The numbers say it all: Get tested!  Prostate cancer is rare before age 40, so if you are 40 or older, the first step is a free, simple PSA screening that only requires a blood sample. “PSA” stands for prostate-specific antigen, a protein produced by prostate cells. The PSA test is done to help diagnose and follow prostate cancer in men.  No certain PSA level is called normal or abnormal, and an elevated level does not mean you have prostate cancer – only a biopsy can diagnose cancer. Always discuss PSA test results with your doctor and be sure to have a digital rectal exam (DRE), as about 6% of men with prostate cancer continue to have normal PSA.

In 2004, Rockford-based Nisus Corporation, a manufacturer of green products for the pest control and wood preservation industries, teamed up with area hospitals and MEDIC Regional Blood Center to create Eddie Check, an annual event that adds free PSA screening for prostate cancer to blood drives. It was a simple strategy using MEDIC’s already existing resources to make it fast and easy for men to get a blood sample drawn for the screening. Nisus has a personal stake in the fight; marketing vice president Jim Gorman is a prostate cancer survivor, while company president Kevin L. Kirkland lost his father, Eddie Kirkland, to the disease. In fact, “Eddie Check” is named for Eddie Kirkland.

Once again, Nisus, MEDIC, Provision CARES Proton Therapy, and Provision CARES Foundation join with sponsors WIVK FM 107.7, Sports Radio WNML 99.1 FM & 990 AM, NewsTalk 98.7 FM, WVLT, and Abacus Arts, Inc.

Sites and Locations

Thursday, September 12

Friday, September 13

Am I at Risk for Prostate Cancer

Am I at Risk for Prostate Cancer?

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September is Prostate Cancer Awareness Month.  It is important to know if you are at risk of prostate cancer and whether you should get an annual Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) level test.

In Tennessee, as well as the United States, prostate cancer has the second highest new cancer rate overall and is the number one cancer for new cancer types among men.(1)    According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), there are an estimated 3,110,403 men living with prostate cancer in the US.  Based on their 2014-2016 data, approximately 11.6% of men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer at some point in their lifetime.  According to SEER, there will be an estimated 174,650 new cases of prostate cancer in 2019 with an estimated 31,620 deaths from prostate cancer.  The five year survival rate for prostate

Prostate cancer is most frequently diagnosed among men aged 65-74 with a median age of 66.  However, 9.2% of new prostate cancer cases are among men under the age of 55.(2)

In addition to age, other factors can increase the risk of being diagnosed, including family history, genetic factors, race, lifestyle and dietary habits.

If an immediate family member such as your father or brother have been diagnosed with prostate cancer, then your risk of developing prostate cancer is 2 to 3 times higher than normal.  Your risk increases with each relative that has been diagnosed with prostate cancer.  Your risk will also increase if two or more close relatives on the same side of the family have been diagnosed with prostate cancer before the age of 55.(3)

African American men have a higher risk and are more likely to be diagnosed at a younger age and have been found to have a more aggressive tumor.

There have not been any studies to prove that diet and nutrition has any direct correlation with developing prostate cancer.  However, if a male who is overweight is diagnosed with prostate cancer, they are at a greater risk for developing a more aggressive cancer.

While there can be lifestyle and dietary habits that can increase your risk of prostate cancer, there are a few myths that have been rumored to increase your risk of prostate cancer.   Sexual activity level is a non-factor as well as having a vasectomy.  Alcohol is another non-risk factor for prostate cancer.

If you do have any of these risk factors, it is important to have your PSA level checked annually.  If you do have an elevated PSA level, your doctor can provide information on additional testing to confirm your diagnosis.

Source:

(1) Center for Disease Control.  Prostate Cancer Statistics.  https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/prostate/statistics/index.htm

(2) National Cancer Institute.  Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program.  Cancer Stat Facts:  Prostate Cancer. https://seer.cancer.gov/statfacts/html/prost.html

(3) Cancer.Net.  Prostate Cancer Statistics.  https://www.cancer.net/cancer-types/prostate-cancer/statistics

Upcoming Events: Prostate Cancer 101: Understanding the Journey Diagnosis, Treatment, and Survival

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Join us for a free presentation to learn more about the latest developments in prostate cancer. Dr. Wilkinson will discuss the most advanced diagnostic tools and current trends in treatment including multiparametric MRI, genomic classification, when to use active surveillance, and how to preserve quality of life after a prostate diagnosis.

Friday, July 26th from 930-11a and Friday August 23rd from 930-11a

Hosted by: Provision CARES Proton Therapy Knoxville, 6450 Provision CARES Way, Knoxville, TN 37909

RSVP: To reserve your seat, please RSVP to Jenni Turner at 865.321.4539 or jenni.turner@provisionhp.com